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Near Gettysburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Abner Doubleday

Major General U.S.V.

 

—1819 - 1893 —

 
Abner Doubleday Monument image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 1, 2008
1. Abner Doubleday Monument
Inscription.
Commanded First Corps Army
of the Potomac at Gettysburg
July 1, 1863

Cadet U.S.M.A. Sept. 1, 1838. Brevet Second Lieut. Third U.S. Artillery July 1, 1842. Second Lieut. First Artillery Feb. 24, 1845. First Lieut. March 3, 1847. Captain March 3, 1855. Major Seventeenth Infantry May 14, 1861. Lieut. Colonel Seventeenth Infantry Sept. 20, 1863. Colonel Thirty-Fifth Infantry Sept. 15, 1867. Unassigned March 15, 1869, Assigned to Twenty-Fourth Infantry Dec 15, 1870. Retired Dec. 11, 1873.

Brigadier-General U.S.V. Feb. 3, 1862. Major-General Nov. 29, 1862. Honorably mustered out of volunteer service August 24, 1865.

Commanding Second Brigade, First Division, Third Corps (McDowell's) at Manassas (1862). First Division, First Corps at South Mountain, Antietam, and Fredericksburg. And Third Division, First Corps at Chancellorsville.

Brevetted Lieut.-Colonel U.S.A. Sept. 17, 1862 "for gallant and meritorious service at the battle of Antietam, Md." Colonel U.S.A. July 2, 1863 "for gallant and meritorious services at the battle of Gettysburg, Pa."

Brevetted Brigadier-General and Major-General U.S.A. March 13, 1865, "for gallant and meritorious services during the war."
 
Erected 1917 by State of New York.
 
Location.
Front Plaque on Monument image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 1, 2008
2. Front Plaque on Monument
39° 49.982′ N, 77° 15.045′ W. Marker is near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in Adams County. Marker is at the intersection of Reynolds Avenue and Meredith Avenue, on the right when traveling north on Reynolds Avenue. Click for map. Located on the First Day Battlefield, just south of McPherson Woods, in Gettysburg National Military Park. Marker is in this post office area: Gettysburg PA 17325, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 142d Pennsylvania Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); 8th New York Cavalry (within shouting distance of this marker); Battery B, First Pennsylvania Artilery (within shouting distance of this marker); 151st Pennsylvania Infantry (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Third Division (about 400 feet away); Battery A, Second U.S. Artillery (about 400 feet away); Major Gen. John F. Reynolds (about 500 feet away); First Brigade (about 500 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Gettysburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. Abner Doubleday. Abner Doubleday (June 26, 1819 – January 26, 1893) was a career United States Army officer and Union general in the American Civil War. He fired the first shot in defense of Fort Sumter, the opening battle of the war, and had a pivotal role in the early fighting at the Battle of
State Seal on Left Side of Monument image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 1, 2008
3. State Seal on Left Side of Monument
Gettysburg. Gettysburg was his finest hour, but his relief by Maj. Gen. George G. Meade caused lasting enmity between the two men. (Submitted on January 4, 2016, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Abner Doubleday Biography - Arlington National Cemetery. Abner Doubleday was born in upstate New York of a family outstanding in military and civil life, he graduated from West Point in 1842, 25th in a class of 56, and was assigned to the Artillery-Infantry. (Submitted on January 4, 2016, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. Reports of Maj. Gen. Abner Doubleday. General Doubleday summarized the actions of the First Corps in the first days' fighting:
It gives me great pleasure to state that my division commanders used unwearied efforts to hold the portions of the line assigned them. General Robinson guarded the right flank with great courage and skill when it was left exposed toward the close of the day. General Wadsworth's division opened the combat, and defended the center of the line to the very last, while General Rowley held the left wing under the most adverse circumstances, and, with a portion of Wadsworth's men, covered the retreat of the main body by successive échelons of resistance. (Submitted on January 12, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Close Up of the Doubleday Statue image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 1, 2008
4. Close Up of the Doubleday Statue
Abner Doubleday Monument image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 23, 2015
5. Abner Doubleday Monument
Doubleday assumed command of the 1st Corps upon the death of General Reynolds. Although he performed well, his performance was not highly regarded by General Meade who passed over Doubleday and reassigned command of the 1st Corps. Doubleday never saw active service for the remainder of the war.
Abner Doubleday Monument image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 23, 2015
6. Abner Doubleday Monument
General Abner Doubleday image. Click for more information.
7. General Abner Doubleday
A career military officer, Doubleday was present at Fort Sumter when the war broke out.
(Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, Call Number: LC-BH82- 150 A <P&P>[P&P])
Click for more information.
Abner Doubleday image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2003
8. Abner Doubleday
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,323 times since then and 211 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   5, 6. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   7. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   8. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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