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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Gettysburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Headquarters of the Army of Northern Virginia

 
 
Headquarters of the Army of Northern Virginia Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 1, 2008
1. Headquarters of the Army of Northern Virginia Marker
Inscription.
C.S.A.
In this field was located
headquarters of the Army of
Northern Virginia
July 1. 2. 3. 4. 1863
"My headquarters were in tents in an
apple orchard back of the Seminary
along the Chambersburg Pike"
Robt. E. Lee

 
Erected 1920 by Gettysburg National Military Park Commission.
 
Location. 39° 50.09′ N, 77° 14.729′ W. Marker is near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in Adams County. Marker is on Chambersburg Pike (U.S. 30), on the right when traveling east. Click for map. Located just west of the Seminary Ridge in Gettysburg National Military Park. Marker is in this post office area: Gettysburg PA 17325, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Lee's Headquarters at Gettysburg (within shouting distance of this marker); Highway Headquarters (within shouting distance of this marker but has been reported missing); a different marker also named Lee's Headquarters at Gettysburg (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Lee's Headquarters at Gettysburg (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Lee's Headquarters at Gettysburg
Plaque on Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 1, 2008
2. Plaque on Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); 95th New York Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Lee's Headquarters at Gettysburg (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Battery B, Fourth U.S. Artillery (about 300 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Gettysburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. General Robert E. Lee. A biographical sketch from the National Park Service. (Submitted on January 13, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Report of General Robert E. Lee. In his official report, General Lee discussed the reasons for invading the North in 1863:
The position occupied by the enemy opposite Fredericksburg -being one in which he could not be attacked to advantage, it was determined to draw him from it. The execution of this purpose embraced the relief of the Shenandoah Valley from the troops that had occupied the lower part of it during the winter and spring, and, if practicable, the transfer of the scene of hostilities north of the Potomac. It was thought that the corresponding movements on the part of the enemy to which those contemplated by us would probably give rise, might offer a fair opportunity
12 pdr Model 1841 Field Gun image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 1, 2008
3. 12 pdr Model 1841 Field Gun
A "heavy" 12-pounder (as opposed to the "light" 12-pounder Napoleon) is used to indicate the headquarters of General Robert E. Lee.
to strike a blow at the army then commanded by General Hooker, and that in any even that army would be compelled to leave Virginia, and, possibly, to draw to its support troops designed to operate against other parts of the country.
(Submitted on January 13, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. Seminary Ridge Orchard and the Thompson House. A look at the battlefield location by Gettysburg Daily. Where was General Lee's headquarters? (Submitted on July 12, 2010, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Lee's Headquarters Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 5, 2010
4. Lee's Headquarters Marker
This view of the Headquarters marker looks southwest, in the direction of McPherson Ridge.
Orchard West of Seminary Ridge image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 1, 2008
5. Orchard West of Seminary Ridge
The orchard indicated on the marker is being replanted to resemble its appearance at the time of the war.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 785 times since then and 92 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   5. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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