Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Gettysburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Ramseur's Brigade

Rodes's Division - Ewell's Corps

 

—Army of Northern Virginia —

 
Ramseur's Brigade Tablet image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 1, 2008
1. Ramseur's Brigade Tablet
Inscription.
C.S.A.
Army of Northern Virginia
Ewell's Corps Rodes's Division
Ramseur's Brigade

2nd. 4th. 14th. 30th. North Carolina Infantry

July 1 Soon after Iverson's and O'Neal's Brigade had each suffered the repulse of three regiments with heavy losses Ramseur's Brigade moved from its position here and vigorously assailed the right wing of the Union forces. The 14th and 30th regiments with O'Neal's 3rd Alabama turned the flank of the Union troops while the 2nd and 4th regiments together with Doles's Brigade and part of O'Neal's struck them in the rear. A struggle ensued in which both sides suffered severely and the conflict here only ended with the retreat of the Union Corps from Seminary Ridge. In that retreat the Brigade made active pursuit and captured many prisoners.

July 2 Skirmishing on the southern borders of the town.

July 3 In sunken road southwest of town.

July 4 In line on Seminary Ridge. At night began the march to Hagerstown.

Present 1090. Killed 20. Wounded 129. Missing 44. Total 196.
 
Erected 1910 by Gettysburg National Military Park Commission.
 
Location. 39° 50.903′ N, 77° 14.676′ W. Marker is near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in Adams County. Marker is on North Confederate Avenue, on the left when traveling north. Click for map. Located near the Eternal Peace Light Memorial (auto tour stop 2) in Gettysburg National Military Park. Marker is in this post office area: Gettysburg PA 17325, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Ramseur's Brigade Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 23, 2015
2. Ramseur's Brigade Marker
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The King William Artillery (within shouting distance of this marker); Second Army Corps (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Eternal Peace Light (about 300 feet away); Hardaway Alabama Artillery (about 300 feet away); Daniel's Brigade (about 300 feet away); General Rodes Attacks (about 400 feet away); Eternal Peace Light Memorial (about 400 feet away); The Orange Artillery (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Gettysburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. Oak Hill. National Park Service virtual tour stop. (Submitted on January 17, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Report of Brig. Gen. S. D. Ramseur. Ramseur described the afternoon fighting in his report:
After resting about fifteen minutes, I received orders to send two regiments to the support of Colonel O'Neal, and with the remaining two to support Iverson. I immediately detached the Second and Fourth North Carolina troops to support O'Neal, and with the Fourteenth and Thirtieth hastened to the support of Iverson. ... I requested Colonel [C. A.] Battle, Third Alabama, to join me, which he cheerfully did. With these regiments (Third Alabama, Fourteenth and Thirtieth North Carolina), I turned the enemy's strong position in a body of woods, surrounded by a stone fence, by attacking en masse on his right flank, driving him back, and getting in his rear. At the time of my advance on the enemy's right, I sent to the commanding officer of the Twelfth North Carolina, of Iverson's brigade,
Ramseur's Brigade Tablet image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 1, 2008
3. Ramseur's Brigade Tablet
to push the enemy in front. This was done. The enemy seeing his right flank turned, made but feeble resistance to the front attack, but ran off the field in confusion, leaving his killed and wounded and between 800 and 900 prisoners in our hands. The enemy was pushed through Gettysburg to the heights beyond, when I received an order to halt, and form line of battle in a street in Gettysburg running east and west.
(Submitted on January 17, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Ramseur's Brigade Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 23, 2015
4. Ramseur's Brigade Marker
Ramseur's Brigade Arrives image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 1, 2008
5. Ramseur's Brigade Arrives
Looking from Mummasburg Road toward the Eternal Light Peace Memorial (on the right). The tablet is just left of center here, with Ewell's Corps Tablet on the left. Ramseur's Brigade arrived as the reserve for Rodes's Division, behind Daniel's, Iverson's, and O'Neal's Brigades. Ramseur deployed with the 14th North Carolina touching the Mummasburg Road, the 30th North Carolina to their left, then the 2nd and 4th North Carolina atop the ridge line, roughly behind where the Peace Memorial is today.
14th and 30th North Carolina Attack image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 1, 2008
6. 14th and 30th North Carolina Attack
Looking east at Oak Ridge, with the observation tower on just left of center. Mummasburg Road is on the left. The 14th and 30th North Carolina, on the right wing of Ramseur's Brigade advanced south of Mummasburg Road and faced the Federal lines on Oak Ridge as they advanced, avoiding the flanking fires that Iverson's men were subjected to earlier.
2nd and 4th North Carolina Attack the Federal Right Flank image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 1, 2008
7. 2nd and 4th North Carolina Attack the Federal Right Flank
Looking toward the Eternal Light Peace Memorial from the east side of the tour road. Exhibits for Confederate artillery are on the right. The left wing of Ramseur's Brigade, along with elements of Doles' and other Brigades attacked down the crest of the ridge line. This attack overlapped the Federal right flank and turned the position, precipitating a general withdraw. The Federal 16th Maine fought a hard delaying action in front of the Confederates to buy time for the withdraw.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 816 times since then and 88 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   5, 6, 7. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on July 21, 2016.
Paid Advertisement