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Near Petersburg in Dinwiddie County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Breakthrough at Hart Farm

The Breakthrough Trail

 

—Pamplin Historical Park —

 
The Breakthrough at Hart Farm Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, April 23, 2007
1. The Breakthrough at Hart Farm Marker
Inscription. “… after going through a leaden and war hail storm, thanks to the God of Battles, I am alive and happy. Our Corps charged the enemy’s lines last night, broke their line and drove them out of sight … I never felt more like fighting than I have today and I kept my shooting iron hot for about an hour and a half, and with prayer all the time. I felt as if I was willing to give my life up freely and I felt assured I would be received in Heaven. The Confederacy is gone up. I lost part of a third finger, right hand. Boys bound it up – am all right and doing well -
- Sergeant Albert C. Harrison, Company G, 14th New Jersey Infantry Regiment

On the morning of April 2, 1865, Union troops of the Third Division, Sixth Army Corps, attacked the Confederate trenches that ran across the Hart Farm. Brigadier General Truman Seymour commanded the division, which consisted of two brigades commanded by Colonel William Truex and Brevet Brigadier General J. Warren Keifer. Three small Confederate regiments defended the earthworks – the 28th North Carolina of Brigadier General James H. Lane’s Brigade and the 11th and 52nd North Carolina of Brigadier General William MacRae’s Brigade.

Union soldiers overran the Confederate line at the Boisseau Farm and quickly outflanked the 28th North Carolina, forcing that regiment
Marker on the Hart House Trail Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, April 23, 2007
2. Marker on the Hart House Trail
to retreat toward the Boydton Plank Road. At about the same time, men of Seymour’s division began crossing the parapets near the Hart house. A small two-gun battery near Arthur’s Swamp and a large six-gun redoubt near Duncan Road, along with all their cannons, fell to the Federals. Most of the soldiers of MacRae’s regiments became prisoners of war.

According to family tradition, Mary Hart and an unnamed slave emerged from the house’s basement after the fighting had shifted toward the southwest. They tended to a mortally wounded Union officer and buried his body in their garden. Mrs. Hart wrote a letter to the officer’s family, who later came to Dinwiddie County to retrieve the remains of their fallen soldier.

I was shooting at Yanks in front of me where they were thick as black birds. They had broke our line on our left & come on us on our left flank. I had seen them, but thought it was our own men until a Cap’t who was in front of his men with sword drawn whacked me over the head twice. Before I realized my situation his men were right at his heels with fixed bayonets.”
- Private John C. Warlick, Company I, 11th North Carolina Infantry Regiment
 
Erected by Pamplin Historical Park.
 
Location. 37° 10.611′ N, 77° 28.603′ 
Marker on the Hart Farm Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, April 23, 2007
3. Marker on the Hart Farm
The marker can be seen in this photo between the Hart house (right) and barn on the spur off the Breakthrough Trail.
W. Marker is near Petersburg, Virginia, in Dinwiddie County. Marker can be reached from Duncan Road (Virginia Route 670), on the left when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is in Pamplin Historical Park, on the Hart House spur of the Breakthrough Trail. Marker is in this post office area: Petersburg VA 23803, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Hart House (within shouting distance of this marker); The Battle of Harmon Road (within shouting distance of this marker); “The Cannons’ Flashes Lit Up the Terrible Scene” (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Sixth Maryland Infantry Monument (about 800 feet away); “The Strongest Line of Works Ever Constructed” (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Hart Farm (approx. 0.2 miles away); McGowan’s South Carolina Brigade (approx. ¼ mile away); Petersburg Breakthrough Battlefield (approx. ¼ mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Petersburg.
 
More about this marker. The top of the marker contains a battle map of the Breakthrough attack, indicating Confederate fortifications, Union troop movements and the location of the marker. The right side of the marker features photographs of Colonel William Truex and Brigadier General William MacRae.
 
Also see . . .
1. Breakthrough at Petersburg
Breakthrough Battle Map from Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, April 23, 2007
4. Breakthrough Battle Map from Marker
. The American Civil War website. (Submitted on January 17, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. The Hart Farm. Pamplin Historical Park website. (Submitted on January 17, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

3. The Final Assault. The Civil War Siege of Petersburg. (Submitted on January 17, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 884 times since then and 58 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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