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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Petersburg in Dinwiddie County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Hart House

The Breakthrough Trail

 

—Pamplin Historical Park —

 
The Hart House Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, April 23, 2007
1. The Hart House Marker
Inscription. Charles H. Carr, a native of New York, purchased twenty acres from the Boisseaus of Tudor Hall in March 1859. He began construction of the house in front of you shortly afterwards. Carr died in July 1862 while enlisted in the Confederate army. In November of that year, his widow sold the house and property to John Hart, a native of Bucks County, Pennsylvania. Hart completed the house and grew market crops on the farm. Most of Hart’s neighbors along Duncan Road to the south also operated small farms that provided produce to the residents of nearby Petersburg. Hart enlisted in the Confederate army in April 1864, leaving the farm in the hands of his wife, Mary.

In September 1864, Confederate soldiers moved into the area and began building earthworks to protect the Boydton Plank Road and South Side Railroad. Following the Battle of Peebles’s Farm in October, troops of Brigadier General William MacRae’s North Carolina Brigade set up winter quarters near the house. During the winter, they improved the rudimentary entrenchments that crossed the property.

The fruit trees are blooming very fast here. Our encampments are in a large ‘Orchard’ in front of Mrs. Hart’s house. Her house is in the same camp. The line runs through her yard. She still stays here. She goes down into the Cellar when they commence shelling.
- Corporal
Marker on the Breakthrough Trail Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, April 23, 2007
2. Marker on the Breakthrough Trail
Benjamin H. Freeman, Company K, 44th North Carolina Infantry Regiment

Sidebar:
The Hart House is a cottage built in the Gothic Revival style, known as “Carpenter Gothic” in North America. This new style adorned modest wood frame cottages with scrolled ornamentation and lacy trim, many of them built according to pattern-book models. The newly invented scroll-saw allowed carpenters to create the delicate bargeboard trim called “gingerbread,” which hangs from the gable end of these houses.

Alexander Jackson Davis (1803-1892), an architect, introduced the Gothic Revival form to America. During his career, Davis designed many public buildings, including the barracks, professors’ residences and other buildings at the Virginia Military Institute. His 1837 book, Rural Residences, included the Dutchess County, New York, home depicted at left. Notice that it is nearly identical to the design of the Hart House.
 
Erected by Pamplin Historical Park.
 
Location. 37° 10.607′ N, 77° 28.632′ W. Marker is near Petersburg, Virginia, in Dinwiddie County. Marker can be reached from Duncan Road (Virginia Route 670), on the left when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is in Pamplin Historical Park, on the Hart
The Hart House Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, April 23, 2007
3. The Hart House
The marker can be seen to the left in this photo of the back side of the Hart House.
Farm loop off the Breakthrough Trail. Marker is in this post office area: Petersburg VA 23803, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Breakthrough at Hart Farm (within shouting distance of this marker); The Battle of Harmon Road (within shouting distance of this marker); “The Cannons’ Flashes Lit Up the Terrible Scene” (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Sixth Maryland Infantry Monument (approx. 0.2 miles away); “The Strongest Line of Works Ever Constructed” (approx. ¼ mile away); The Hart Farm (approx. ¼ mile away); McGowan’s South Carolina Brigade (approx. ¼ mile away); The Boisseau Family Cemetery (approx. ¼ mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Petersburg.
 
More about this marker. The upper left of the marker contains a picture from the book of “Alexander Jackson Davis, Gate-House in the Rustic Cottage Style.” Below the sidebar is a detailed picture of a “Gable with bargeboard. Homes in Carpenter Gothic style have highly ornamented bargeboards.” Below this is a “Floor-plan, taken from a 19th century pattern book [which] is nearly identical to that of the Hart House.”
 
Also see . . .
The Hart House Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, April 23, 2007
4. The Hart House
The entrance to the cellar, where Mary Hart sought refuge during the shelling, can be seen next to the house.
1. Breakthrough at Petersburg. The American Civil War website. (Submitted on January 18, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. The Hart Farm. Pamplin Historical Park website. (Submitted on January 18, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

3. The Final Assault. The Civil War Siege of Petersburg. (Submitted on January 18, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. Notable BuildingsNotable PlacesWar, US Civil
 
The Hart Farm Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, April 23, 2007
5. The Hart Farm
The Hart House (right) and barn can be seen here along the Breakthrough Trail in Pamplin Historical Park.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 761 times since then and 47 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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