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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Petersburg in Dinwiddie County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Confederate Fortifications

The Breakthrough Trail

 

—Pamplin Historical Park —

 
The Confederate Fortifications Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 23, 2007
1. The Confederate Fortifications Marker
Inscription. The earthen wall in front of you is a part of the main Confederate defense line begun in 1864 and defended until April 2, 1865. You are standing behind the line facing southeast towards the Union positions about one mile away.

When Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant’s forces established a toehold on the Petersburg & Weldon Railroad in August 1864, General Robert E. Lee lost his direct communication and supply line to North Carolina. This break in the rails forced the Confederates to off-load supplies at Stony Creek Station, eighteen miles south of Petersburg, and transport them by wagon to Dinwiddie Court House. From there, the Boydton Plank Road (modern U.S. Highway 1) led directly into Petersburg.

In order to protect this new supply line, Lee expanded his defenses eight miles to the southwest parallel to the Boydton Plank Road. The well-preserved fortifications in front of you formed only a part of an extensive defensive network protecting Richmond and Petersburg that by the spring stretched some 45 miles in length.
 
Erected by Pamplin Historical Park.
 
Location. 37° 10.821′ N, 77° 28.502′ W. Marker is in Petersburg, Virginia, in Dinwiddie County. Marker can be reached from Duncan Road (Virginia
Confederate Fortifications image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 23, 2007
2. Confederate Fortifications
These fortifications, located in front of the marker, were manned by Confederate soldiers until they fell to the Union during the Breakthrough Battle on April 2, 1865.
Route 670), on the left when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is in Pamplin Historical Park, on the Breakthrough Trail. Marker is in this post office area: Petersburg VA 23803, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Petersburg Breakthrough Battlefield (a few steps from this marker); The Breakthrough Trail (within shouting distance of this marker); McGowan’s South Carolina Brigade (within shouting distance of this marker); Confederate Winter Quarters (within shouting distance of this marker); “The Strongest Line of Works Ever Constructed” (within shouting distance of this marker); Confederate Winter Huts (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); 1st Lieutenant Octavius Augustus Wiggins (about 300 feet away); Lieutenant Colonel George B. Damon (about 300 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Petersburg.
 
More about this marker. The right side of the marker features a map of the fortifications in the Petersburg area during the siege of 1864-65. The location of the marker is indicated on this map. It has a caption of “General Robert E. Lee expanded his fortifications in September and October, 1864 to protect his new supply line along the Boydton Plank Road. Lee ordered additional earthworks built connecting Confederate Battery
Petersburg Fortifications Map from Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 23, 2007
3. Petersburg Fortifications Map from Marker
45 in Petersburg’s original defenses with Hatcher’s Run.”
 
Also see . . .
1. Breakthrough at Petersburg. The American Civil War website. (Submitted on January 18, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. The Breakthrough Trail. Pamplin Historical Park website. (Submitted on January 18, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

3. The Final Assault. The Civil War Siege of Petersburg. (Submitted on January 18, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. Notable EventsNotable PlacesWar, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 825 times since then and 77 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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