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Sullivans Island in Charleston County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Oceola / Patapsco Dead

 
 
OCEOLA Marker image. Click for full size.
By Charles R. Robbins, Jr., July 13, 2006
1. OCEOLA Marker
Inscription. (Grave Marker):
Oceola
Patriot and Warrior
Died at Fort Moultrie
January 30th 1838

(Historical Marker):
A Seminole Leader
Perhaps Fort Moultrie's most celebrated resident was Osceola, famed Seminole leader who led his people in their fight to remain in Florida rather than submit to removal to the Indian Territory. Osceola was given freedom of the fort while being held here from January 1838, until his death from throat infection on January 30.

Patapsco Dead
Near the end of the Civil War on the night of January 15, 1865, the Union ironclad monitor U. S. S. Patapsco sank in Charleston harbor, victim of a Confederate mine. Sixty-two men lost their lives; five of them are buried here.
 
Location. 32° 45.586′ N, 79° 51.466′ W. Marker is in Sullivans Island, South Carolina, in Charleston County. Marker is on Middle Street. Click for map. Located at Fort Moultrie Unit of Fort Sumter National Monument. Marker is in this post office area: Sullivans Island SC 29482, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Traverse c.1820 (within shouting distance of this marker); Powder Magazine (within shouting
Oceola Marker image. Click for full size.
By Robert, June 20, 2006
2. Oceola Marker
distance of this marker); Harbor Defense 1809-1860 (within shouting distance of this marker); Northwest Bastionet (within shouting distance of this marker); Enlisted Men's Barracks (within shouting distance of this marker); Defending Charleston (within shouting distance of this marker); Harbor Vigilance (within shouting distance of this marker); Harbor Defense (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Sullivans Island.
 
Also see . . .  Wikipedia entry for Osceola. "On October 21, 1837, on the orders of U.S. General Thomas Sidney Jesup, Osceola was captured when he arrived for supposed truce negotiations in Fort Payton." (Submitted on January 19, 2009, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesNative AmericansNotable Persons
 
Fort Moultrie image. Click for full size.
By Charles R. Robbins, Jr., July 13, 2006
3. Fort Moultrie
Oceola and USS Patapsco Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, August 14, 2011
4. Oceola and USS Patapsco Marker
U.S.S. Patapsco Monument base image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, August 14, 2011
5. U.S.S. Patapsco Monument base
2 sides of the memorial are weatherworn as to render names unreadable
Osceola image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 9, 2015
6. Osceola
This 1838 portrait of Osceola by George Catlin hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC.

“The Seminole Indians of the Southeast were directly affected by Andrew Jackson's policy of Indian removal, and although a portion of his tribe's leadership gave in to the federal government, Osceola led the resistance. Unlike Black Hawk, who fought the Americans in the West, Osceola did not take on the U.S. military in open battle, but conducted a campaign of guerrilla warfare, harassing federal authorities from the Seminole base in the Everglades. Osceola was captured after the Americans violated a flag of truce. He died in prison shortly thereafter, but the Seminole, famously, never surrendered to the United States.” — National Portrait Gallery
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Charles R. Robbins, Jr. of Rock Hill, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 957 times since then and 52 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Charles R. Robbins, Jr. of Rock Hill, South Carolina.   2. submitted on , by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.   3. submitted on , by Charles R. Robbins, Jr. of Rock Hill, South Carolina.   4, 5. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   6. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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