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Henrico in Henrico County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Fort Harrison

Richmond Battlefield

 

óRichmond Natíl Battlefield Pk – 1862/64 ó

 
Fort Harrison Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 24, 2007
1. Fort Harrison Marker
Inscription. Fort Harrison stood in 1864 as the most powerful fort in the extensive outer defenses of Richmond. Built on high, open ground, the fort and its surrounding entrenchments were built to protect the approaches to Richmond from the south. The Union armyís strongest probe toward Richmond from this direction occurred on September 29, when General Butlerís Army of the James crossed the river in two columns and struck the defenses here and at New Market Heights to the east. The Union troops captured both targets, but were unable to make any further progress against the smaller fortifications at Fort Gilmer, Fort Gregg, Fort Johnson, and Fort Hoke. Confederate counterattacks the next day failed to recover the lost ground and produced a stalemate that was unbroken until Richmond was evacuated in April 1865.

Although Federal operations here did not achieve the immediate capture of Richmond, the permanent presence of Northern soldiers so close to the capital city did contribute to the extension of the Confederate lines. The fall of Fort Harrison provoked more fighting. Three separate October battles along the Darbytown Road, north of here, increased the pressure on Richmondís defenses, and kept the armies active in this area until the decisive events of the following spring.

Left Marker: Fort Harrison / Chaffinís Farm
There
Walking Trail through Fort Harrison image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 24, 2007
2. Walking Trail through Fort Harrison
The earthworks of the left in this photo were part of Confederate Fort Harrison. Those on the right were part of Federal Fort Burhham, built by Union troops after taking the fort on September 29, 1864.
were very many greater fights, and greater numbers killed, during the war, but never was more courage displayed on any field than those men showed in their effort to recapture Fort Harrison. It was a hopeless charge, but it made defeat glorious and Chaffinís Farm immortal.

-- 2nd Lt. Thomas Porterfield, 2nd Pennsylvania Provisional Heavy Artillery, speaking of the Confederates on September 30, 1864
 
Erected by Richmond National Battlefield Park - National Park Service.
 
Location. This marker has been replaced by another marker nearby. It was located near 37° 25.684′ N, 77° 22.391′ W. Marker was in Henrico, Virginia, in Henrico County. Marker could be reached from Battlefield Park Road, on the left when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is in the Fort Harrison Unit of Richmond National Battlefield Park. Marker was in this post office area: Henrico VA 23231, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. A different marker also named Fort Harrison (within shouting distance of this marker); First Park Headquarters (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named First Park Headquarters (within shouting distance of this marker);
Fort Harrison / Burnham image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 24, 2007
3. Fort Harrison / Burnham
Federal troops successfully took Confederate Fort Harrison on September 29, 1864, and renamed it Fort Burnham.
Fort Harrison Trail (within shouting distance of this marker); Freedom Fighters (within shouting distance of this marker); Confederate Counterattack (within shouting distance of this marker); A Unique Photograph (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Counterattack (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Henrico.
 
More about this marker. The left of the main marker contains a map of the different units of Richmond National Battlefield Park , with the location of Fort Harrison indicated. The lower right of the marker includes a map of the fortifications from Fort Gilmer to Fort Brady. The left marker features a picture of Union troops fighting off a Confederate counterattack at Fort Harrison.
 
Regarding Fort Harrison. This marker was replaced by a new one also named Fort Harrison (see nearby markers).
 
Also see . . .
1. Battlefield Tour - Ft Gilmer to Ft Brady. Richmond National Battlefield Park website. (Submitted on January 20, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. Fort Harrison
Richmond National Battlefield Park image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 24, 2007
4. Richmond National Battlefield Park
Marker is in the Fort Harrison Unit of Richmond National Battlefield Park.
. Richmond Battlefields Fort Harrison website. (Submitted on January 20, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar, US Civil
 
Richmond Battlefields image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 24, 2007
5. Richmond Battlefields
The national battlefield park contains sites relating to three separate events of the Civil War: the Seven Days Campaign of 1862, the Overland Campaign of 1864, and the late-war fighting north of the James River.
Fort Harrison Area Map from Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 24, 2007
6. Fort Harrison Area Map from Marker
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 963 times since then and 72 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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