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Appomattox Court House in Appomattox County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Grantís Pursuit

 
 
Grantís Pursuit Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, April 26, 2007
1. Grantís Pursuit Marker
Inscription.
The four-year effort to vanquish the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia came to its climax in the fields before you.

Legs will win the battle men Ö. They canít escape, if you will keep up to it.
Maj. Gen. E.O.C.Ord, Commander, Union Army of the James, to his men on April 8, 1865

Since the fall of Petersburg the week before, Grant and his armies had pursued Lee relentlessly. One Union column slashed at Leeís rear guard. Another moved along Leeís left flank, trying to cut the Confederates off. On the evening of April 8, Union cavalry reached Appomattox Station and captured trainloads of rations – food for a Confederate army that had not been fully fed in days.

On the morning of April 9, 1865, Union troops at last put themselves across Leeís path. Union cavalry battled Leeís men on the distant ridge. Lee attempted to break through, but soon Union infantry joined the fight too. Any hope that the Confederates could move westward on the Richmond-Lynchburg Stage Road (present Route 24) vanished. Lee now had but one rational choice: surrendered.

More than 60,000 Union troops – most of three armies – pursued Lee to Appomattox Court House. On April 8 they mounted a final effort, and on April 9, they finally blocked Leeís way west. They deployed just in front of you –
Marker in Appomattox Court House NHP Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, April 26, 2007
2. Marker in Appomattox Court House NHP
in the fields on either side of the Richmond-Lynchburg Stage Road.

It was a steeple chase, hurdle race and go-as-you please contest combinedÖ So short were the stops made, that there was no time to unsling knapsacks and each man as the halt was called threw himself down at full length for restÖ A steady and rapid march for fourteen hours...
George W. Linn, 10th Pennsylvania, describing the Union march on April 8, 1865
 
Erected by Appomattox Court House National Historical Park, National Park Service, Dept. of the Interior.
 
Location. 37° 22.387′ N, 78° 49.022′ W. Marker is in Appomattox Court House, Virginia, in Appomattox County. Marker is on Virginia Route 24, on the left when traveling west. Click for map. Marker is in the Appomattox Court House National Historical Park, near the western entrance to the park. Marker is in this post office area: Appomattox VA 24522, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Battle of Appomattox Station (a few steps from this marker); “Message of Peace” (a few steps from this marker); Education in 1800's Rural Virginia (approx. 0.6 miles away); Raine Cemetery and Monument
Richmond-Lynchburg Stage Road Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, April 26, 2007
3. Richmond-Lynchburg Stage Road
The Confederate retreat was stopped on this road, just across the street from the marker.
(approx. 0.7 miles away); North Carolina (approx. 0.7 miles away); Confederate Artillery Position (approx. ĺ mile away); Walker's Last Stand (approx. ĺ mile away); A Strategic Delay (approx. 0.8 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Appomattox Court House.
 
More about this marker. The bottom of the marker contains a picture of Federal troops on the march. It has a caption of “This sketch (below) shows Union troops on the road to Appomattox Court House. During the final push on April 8, some Union units marched more than 35 miles. By the time they reached Appomattox Court House, many Federal soldiers were only slightly less fatigued and hungry than their Confederate counterparts.” Above this is a map showing the Confederate Retreat and Union pursuit from Petersburg to Appomattox Court House, indicating encounters along the way.
 
Also see . . .
1. Appomattox Court House National Historic Park. National Park Service website. (Submitted on January 21, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. Appomattox Court House
Grantís Pursuit Map from Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, April 26, 2007
4. Grantís Pursuit Map from Marker
. CWSAC Battle Summaries website. (Submitted on January 21, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 771 times since then and 58 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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