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Near Gettysburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Wounded and the Dead

 
 
The Wounded and the Dead Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, November 11, 2008
1. The Wounded and the Dead Marker
Inscription. "Every conceivable wound that iron and lead can make, blunt or sharp, bullet, ball and shell, piercing, bruising, tearing, was there...."
1lst Lt. Frank A. Haskell, U.S.A.
Aide to Brig. Gen. John Gibbon

In the three days at Gettysburg, 7,708 soldiers were killed. 26,856 were wounded. Never before had there been so many dead, dying, and maimed on an American battlefield. The human misery was monumental, as was the task of caring for the wounded and burying the dead.

Schools, churches, homes, and farm buildings - including John Slyder's farm in front of you - were converted into emergency shelters and field hospitals. Clothing and sheets were ripped for bandages, and barn doors became operating tables. Army surgeons labored until they collapsed. Amputated arms and legs accumulated in piles.

Doctors, nurses, and volunteers remained at Gettysburg four months to care for the wounded. Citizens also responded to the soldiers' suffering with donations of money, food, letters, and gifts.

Few civilians were injured during the battle, but many, like the Slyders here, lost property, livestock, and crops.

A Painful Scene
A trooper of the 3rd Pennsylvania Cavalry served picket duty here at the Slyder farm the night after the battle:
"The house was being used as a field hospital and was filled with
Farnsworth's Charge Wayside Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain
2. Farnsworth's Charge Wayside
On the left is "The Wounded and Dead" wayside. On the right is "Farnsworth's Cavalry Charge."
wounded upon whom the surgeons were engaged in their revolting work. As fast as the men died their bodies were taken out of the house and into the rain and left there temporarily. The scene was so painful and sickening to us that we determined to remain with the picket reserve out in the pitiless downpour of rain."

Gettysburg Casualties
Union Killed 3,149
Wounded 14,501
Missing/Captured 5,157
Total 22,807

Confederate
Killed 4,559
Wounded 12,355
Missing/Captured 5,643
Total 22,557

"Killed" do not include wounded who died after the battle. Figures are based on incomplete records. Confederate losses may have been as high as 28,000.
 
Erected by Gettysburg National Military Park.
 
Location. 39° 47.133′ N, 77° 14.795′ W. Marker is near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in Adams County. Marker is on South Confederate Avenue, on the left when traveling east. Click for map. Located at a wayside pull off between Bushman Hill and Big Round Top in Gettysburg National Military Park. Marker is in this post office area: Gettysburg PA 17325, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Farnsworth's Cavalry Charge (here, next to this marker); William Wells (about
Federal Dead on First Day Battlefield image, Click for more information
By Craig Swain
3. Federal Dead on First Day Battlefield
Interment crews are seen in this wartime photo burying the dead on the fields north of Gettysburg.
(Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, Reproduction number: LC-USZC4-1827).
Click for more information.
500 feet away, measured in a direct line); First Brigade (about 500 feet away); Battery E, Fourth U.S. Artillery (about 800 feet away); 18th Pennsylvania Cavalry (approx. 0.2 miles away); 5th New York Cavalry (approx. 0.2 miles away); First Regiment Vermont Cavalry (approx. 0.2 miles away); Third Division (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Gettysburg.
 
More about this marker. In the upper center is a photograph of A field hospital of the Union Second Corps at Gettysburg shortly after the battle. About 15% of Civil War wounded died of their wounds; in Vietnam, by comparison the figure was less than 1%.

In the lower center is another photo of Graves of Confederate dead on the battlefield two days after the battle. Such graves were sometimes located adjacent to field hospitals.

On the lower right is photo of a bullet. Many soldiers listed as wounded died days or weeks later. This bullet remained in the brain of a 20-year-old Wisconsin soldier 82 days before he died.
 
Also see . . .
Stereo View of the Confederate Dead image, Click for more information
By Craig Swain
4. Stereo View of the Confederate Dead
Confederate dead at Rose Woods, a short distance north of the Slyder Farm.

(Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, Reproduction number: LC-USZ62-117572.)
Click for more information.
 The Dreadful Aftermath. National Park Service page discussing the handling of casualties on the battlefield. (Submitted on January 21, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,021 times since then and 71 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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