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Appomattox Court House in Appomattox County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

A Strategic Delay

Appomattox Court House Natíl Hist Park

 
 
A Strategic Delay Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, April 26, 2007
1. A Strategic Delay Marker
Inscription. As Leeís Confederate Army retreated west, Federal forces blocked their way. Near this spot, Union artillery pieces commanded by Lieutenant James H. Lord and a cavalry brigade led by Brevet Brigadier General Charles Smith proved a strategic delay to the Confederate retreat – allowing time for other Federal units to move into position and ensure General Robert E. Leeís surrender on April 9, 1865.


 
Erected by Appomattox Court House National Historical Park, National Park Service, Dept. of the Interior.
 
Location. 37° 22.557′ N, 78° 48.199′ W. Marker is in Appomattox Court House, Virginia, in Appomattox County. Marker is on Old Courthouse Road (Virginia Route 24), on the right when traveling west. Click for map. Marker is in the Appomattox Court House National Historical Park, at the Confederate Cemetery wayside. Marker is in this post office area: Appomattox VA 24522, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Appomattox Court House Confederate Cemetery (a few steps from this marker); Appomattox (within shouting distance of this marker); Confederate Cemetery (within shouting distance of this marker); Wartime Landscape
Battle Map from Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, April 26, 2007
2. Battle Map from Marker
(about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); North Carolina (about 400 feet away); Sears Lane (about 400 feet away); Raine Memorial (about 400 feet away); a different marker also named North Carolina (about 600 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Appomattox Court House.
 
More about this marker. The bottom of the marker contains a photograph of the Union artillery and cavalry brigade that blocked the Confederate retreat. Two photographs appear at the top of the marker. They are of “James H. Lord (1832-1896), an 1857 graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point and a Pennsylvanian, received the brevet rank of major for gallant and meritorious service in action at Appomattox Court House,” and “William P. Roberts (1841-1910) was the youngest Confederate general in service. He was promoted brigadier general in February 1865.” The top right of the marker contains a battle map. It has the caption “During the early hours of April 9, 1865, Confederate forces moved into position on the west side of Appomattox Court House and prepared to launch a dawn assault to open the road.
A Strategic Delay Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, April 18, 2010
3. A Strategic Delay Marker
Before daylight Lordís two 3-inch Ordnance Rifles (blue cannons on map) began firing shells into the Confederate formations. Skirmishers of the 1st Maine Cavalry (blue dots on the map) moved forward to support Lordís battery. When Southern troops advanced, the Federal skirmishers withdrew and Lordís cannoneers fled. Brigadier General William P. Robertsí North Carolina cavalry brigade captured the two Union cannons and some remaining artillerymen, but the delay helped secure the Confederate surrender.”
 
Also see . . .
1. Appomattox Court House National Historic Park. National Park Service website. (Submitted on January 21, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. Appomattox Court House. CWSAC Battle Summaries website. (Submitted on January 21, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Artillery at Appomattox Court House Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, April 26, 2007
4. Artillery at Appomattox Court House
The last Federal battery taken by the Confederates was captured by the North Carolina Cavalry Brigade of Brig. Gen. W. P. Roberts at this place. This cannon is located within sight of the marker.
Robert's Charge Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, April 18, 2010
5. Robert's Charge
The last successful cavalry charge from the Army of Northern Virginia came when Robert's 4th and 7th North Carolina Cavalry moved up the slope here to capture two federal guns.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 948 times since then and 84 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   3. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   5. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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