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Near Gettysburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Twelfth U.S. Infantry

First Brigade - Second Division

 

—Fifth Corps —

 
Twelfth U.S. Infantry Regiment Tablet image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 11, 2008
1. Twelfth U.S. Infantry Regiment Tablet
Above the tablet is the crest of the U.S. Army. Note the Maltese Cross at the top of the tablet, the symbol of the Fifth Corps.
Inscription.
Army of the Potomac
Fifth Corps
Second Division
First Brigade
Twelfth U.S. Infantry

Eight Companies
Captain Thomas S. Dunn Commanding

July 2 Arrived in the morning and took position with the Brigade and Division near the Twelfth Corps on the right. Moved with the Division from the right to the left of the line and at 5 p.m. with the Brigade moved across Plum Run near Little Round Top and supported the Second Brigade in its advance to the crest of the rocky wooded hill in front and facing left engaged the Confederates but retired under a heavy fire on both flanks and from the rear after the Confederates had obtained possession of the Wheatfield in the rear of the Brigade and went into position on Little Round Top.

July 3 Remained in same position.

July 4 Regiment with the 14th supported the 3d, 4th, and 8th U.S. Infantry in a reconnoissance and developed a force of the Confederate Infantry and Artillery in front.

Casualties. Killed 1 officer 7 men. Wounded 4 officers 87 men. Missing 13 men.
 
Erected 1907 by Gettysburg National Military Park Commission.
 
Location. 39° 47.685′ N, 77° 14.467′ W. Marker is near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in Adams County
Tablets on the Ayres Avenue Loop image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 11, 2008
2. Tablets on the Ayres Avenue Loop
The 12th U.S. Infantry Tablet in front of the 11th U.S. Infantry Tablet on the right.
. Marker is on Ayres Avenue, on the left when traveling west. Click for map. Located on a loop in Ayres Avenue near the Wheatfield and Day's Hill, in Gettysburg National Military Park. Marker is in this post office area: Gettysburg PA 17325, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Sixth U.S. Infantry (a few steps from this marker); Eleventh U.S. Infantry (a few steps from this marker); First Brigade (a few steps from this marker); Tenth U.S. Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); Fourth U.S. Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); Second Brigade (within shouting distance of this marker); Seventeenth U.S. Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); 13th Pennsylvania Reservers (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Gettysburg.
 
Also see . . .  The Wheatfield. National Park Service virtual tour stop. (Submitted on January 24, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Report of Captain Thomas S. Dunn
A segment from the Official Reports, Series I, Volume XXVII/1 (S#43), Report number 208, pages 640-1.
The First Brigade, Second Division, Fifth Army Corps, of which the battalion formed a part, was moved to the front about
The U.S. Regulars in Day's Brigade Take Fire from the Left image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 11, 2008
3. The U.S. Regulars in Day's Brigade Take Fire from the Left
Looking south from Day's Hill. At the end of the tree line in the center are the rocky outcroppings called the Devil's Den. As the 12th U.S. and other elements of Day's Brigade lay in the second line, they were subjected to harassing fire from Confederates at the Devil's Den, which Captain Dunn describes as "a hill to our left and slightly in our rear."
5 p.m. on the 2d instant, and took position at the foot of a hill near our extreme left, and immediately in rear of a marsh dividing it from a wood held by the enemy. After remaining in this position under a slight fire of musketry for about fifteen minutes, the brigade advanced through the marsh to a hill immediately under the wood in front, there forming three lines, the Twelfth U.S. Infantry in rear. The men were ordered to lie down. In this position they were exposed to a severe fire from the enemy's sharpshooters, holding a hill to our left and slightly in our rear.

The battalion remained in this position until I received an order to move by the right flank a distance equal to my front. During the execution of this order, the troops on our right having fallen back in some disorder, the enemy rapidly advancing, I received from General Ayres, commanding division, the order to face by the rear rank and march to the position first occupied. The battalion marched to the rear in quick time under a galling fire, in good order, until I received an order to double-quick. This order was obeyed until the battalion reached a stone wall about midway in the valley. I then ordered the left wing to about-face and fire. They delivered their fire, and again joined the right wing, moving to the rear. The battalion was halted on the brow of the hill and faced to the front. The fire gradually slackened as night approached.
    — Submitted January 24, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.

 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 508 times since then and 62 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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