Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Gettysburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Eleventh U.S. Infantry

Second Brigade - Second Division

 

—Fifth Corps —

 
Eleventh U.S. Infantry Regiment Tablet image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 11, 2008
1. Eleventh U.S. Infantry Regiment Tablet
Above the tablet is the crest of the U.S. Army. Note the Maltese Cross at the top of the tablet, the symbol of the Fifth Corps.
Inscription.
Army of the Potomac
Fifth Corps
Second Division Second Brigade
Eleventh U.S. Infantry

Six Companies
Major Delancey Floyd Jones commanding

July 2 Arrived in the morning with the Brigade and took position on the right of the Twelfth Corps. Afterwards moved to the left and at 5 p.m. formed line on the right of Little Round Top and advanced across Plum Run and to the crest of the rock wooded hill in front under a fire of sharpshooters on the left and faced to the left with the Wheatfield on the right and rear.
The Confederates having opened fire on the right flank and advancing through the Wheatfield in the rear the Regiment with the Brigade was withdrawn under a heavy fire of musketry and Artillery and formed in line at the right of Little Round Top.

July 3 Remained in same position.

Present 23 officers and 281 men.
Casualties. Killed 3 officers and 18 men. Wounded 7 officers and 85 men. Missing 9 men.
 
Erected 1907 by Gettysburg National Military Park Commission.
 
Location. 39° 47.685′ N, 77° 14.477′ W. Marker is near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in Adams County. Marker is on Ayres Avenue, on the left when traveling west. Click for map. Located on
Eleventh U.S. Infantry Tablet image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 11, 2008
2. Eleventh U.S. Infantry Tablet
The tablet stands a short distance off Ayres Avenue, along a fence line extending south on Houck's Ridge.
a loop in Ayres Avenue near the Wheatfield and Day's Hill, in Gettysburg National Military Park. Marker is in this post office area: Gettysburg PA 17325, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Twelfth U.S. Infantry (a few steps from this marker); Tenth U.S. Infantry (a few steps from this marker); Sixth U.S. Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); First Brigade (within shouting distance of this marker); Fourth U.S. Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); Seventeenth U.S. Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); Second Brigade (within shouting distance of this marker); 13th Pennsylvania Reservers (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Gettysburg.
 
Also see . . .  The Wheatfield. National Park Service virtual tour stop. (Submitted on January 24, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Report of Major DeLancey Floyd-Jones
A section from the Official Reports, Series I, Volume XXVII/1 (S#43), Report number 215, pages 649-50.
Immediately upon reaching this, we were ordered to advance in line of battle, passing from the shelter of a wood across an open field, through which ran a heavy morass. We advanced in good order, although exposed to a flank fire from the enemy, and halted immediately in front of a piece of woods, where we lay some half hour or more. Our brigade then relieved some troops of the Second Corps, for which purpose we advanced into the woods, at the same time changing our direction by a wheel to the left.
After firing a few rounds in the woods, it was discovered that the enemy was turning our right flank, and we were ordered to fall back, which was turning good order until we reached half way across the open field, when we became exposed to a cross-fire of the enemy, the effect of which was most deadly upon officers and men.
Our loss up to this time had been comparatively slight, but in a few minutes we lost nearly half of the regiment, and that, too, without inflicting the slightest damage upon the enemy. We finally reached the wood, when we were enabled to reform and face the enemy.
    — Submitted January 24, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.

 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 541 times since then and 67 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement