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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Gettysburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Images of Death

July 2, 1863 - Second Day

 
 
Images of Death Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, November 11, 2008
1. Images of Death Marker
Inscription. "It was now near nightfall, and the operations of the day were over. ...I commenced the melancholy task of looking up my numerous dead and wounded. It was a sad list."
Brig. Gen. J.B. Kershaw, C.S.A.
Kershaw's Brigade, McLaws' Division

In 1863 this land was farmed by John Rose who lived in the stone house visible in front of you.

On the afternoon of July 2, Georgians and South Carolinians of Anderson's, Semmes', and Kershaw's Brigades advanced and retreated across this ground in their bloody assaults on the Wheatfield, located just beyond the woods behind you. Many Confederate soldiers fell here, the grim harvest of Union riflemen and artillerists.

The photographs in this exhibit are from a series of ten views taken here on the Rose Farm by Civil War photographer Alexander Gardner on July 5, 1863. The bloated bodies are unknown Confederate soldiers. They had been dead for three days.
 
Erected by Gettysburg National Military Park.
 
Location. 39° 47.745′ N, 77° 14.859′ W. Marker is near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in Adams County. Marker is on Brooke Avenue, on the left when traveling north. Click for map. Located in the Rose Woods, a short distance from the Avenue, in Gettysburg National
Kershaw's Brigade Tablet and the "Images of Death" Wayside Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain
2. Kershaw's Brigade Tablet and the "Images of Death" Wayside
Military Park. Marker is in this post office area: Gettysburg PA 17325, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Kershaw's Brigade (a few steps from this marker); 145th Pennsylvania Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); 27th Connecticut Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); 27th Regiment Connecticut Volunteers Position (within shouting distance of this marker); 53rd Pennsylvania Infantry (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Semmes's Brigade (about 300 feet away); Fourth Brigade (about 300 feet away); 64th New York Infantry (about 300 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Gettysburg.
 
More about this marker. In the upper part of the marker is a Historic photo taken on this farm July 5, 1863, three days after the Confederates pictured had been killed. In the lower center is another of Gardner's photos. The photographer found these fifteen corpses laid out in a "V". Confederate comrades probably collected the bodies, but were forced to abandon them when they retreated July 4. Union soldiers were left the task of burial. In the lower right is Another of Alexander Gardner's views of the battlefield dead taken along the edge of these woods. Note the photographer's wagon
Another of Gardner's Photos image, Click for more information
By Craig Swain
3. Another of Gardner's Photos
Another view of the "V" arrangement of Confederate bodies.

(Civil War photographs, 1861-1865 / compiled by Hirst D. Milhollen and Donald H. Mugridge, Washington, D.C. : Library of Congress, 1977. No. 0201)
Click for more information.
(upper left) where the glass plate negatives were developed.

 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Ayres, Cross, and Brooke Avenues Virtual tour by Markers
 
Also see . . .  The Wheatfield. National Park Service virtual tour stop. (Submitted on January 26, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
The Rose House Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, November 11, 2008
4. The Rose House
Standing between the Peach Orchard and Wheatfield, the Rose House witnessed some of the most vicious fighting of the battle.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 887 times since then and 48 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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