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Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

555th Parachute Infantry Battalion

“Triple Nickels” “Smoke Jumpers”

 

1943 - 1947

 
555th Parachute Infantry Battalion Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 30, 2008
1. 555th Parachute Infantry Battalion Marker
Inscription. In memory of America's first Black paratroopers, their successor units, and their supporters whose pioneering efforts and sacrifices have contributed to the development of the world's finest airborne forces.

"All the Way!"

 
Erected 1995 by the 555th Parachute Infantry Association.
 
Location. 38° 52.62′ N, 77° 4.539′ W. Marker is in Arlington National Cemetery, Virginia, in Arlington County. Click for map. Marker is off Farragut Drive in Cemetery Section 23. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Myer VA 22211, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Montford Point Marines (a few steps from this marker); Memorial to US Airmen killed in Denmark (within shouting distance of this marker); 92d Infantry Division (within shouting distance of this marker); The Tuskegee Airmen of World War II (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Exercise Tiger Memorial (about 400 feet away); Mast of the USS Maine (about 400 feet away but has been reported missing); U.S.S. Maine Anchor (about 400 feet away); Ignace Jan Paderewski (about 400 feet away but has been reported missing). Click for a list of all markers in Arlington National Cemetery.
 
Also see . . .
555th Parachute Infantry Battalion marker and memorial tree image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 30, 2008
2. 555th Parachute Infantry Battalion marker and memorial tree
Arlington National Cemetery, Section 23 (note also the Montford Point Marines marker, upper right).

1. The Triple "Nickles". (Submitted on September 14, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
2. Operation Fire Fly and the 555th. (Submitted on September 14, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
3. 2nd Ranger Infantry Company (Airborne) - Korea. In December 1949, the 555th Parachute Infantry Regiment was inactivated and re-designated as the 3rd Battalion, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division. In November 1950, members of that battalion were assigned to the newly formed 2nd Ranger Company (Airborne) which was activated at that time along with three other “separate” Ranger companies (all-White) for service in the Korean War. It became the first, last and only all-Black Ranger unit in the U.S. Army. (Submitted on January 20, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. 2nd Ranger Infantry Company (Airborne).
The Triple Nickels' "successor units" include the 2nd Ranger Company (Airborne) which was attached to the 187th Airborne Regimental Combat Team during the Korean War. Veterans of WWII's Operation Fire Fly would be in its ranks during the First UN Counteroffensive and the airborne assault on Munsan-ni, Korea, 23 March 1951. The first and only all-Black unit to ever make a combat parachute jump behind enemy lines, the 2nd Ranger Company achieved all of its objectives at Munsan-ni under the leadership of Captain Warren E. Allen, suffering relatively light casualties, and earning the Bronze Arrowhead for Parachute Assault.
    — Submitted January 20, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.

 
Additional keywords. Firefighters; Operation Fire Fly; 2nd Ranger Company (Airborne); 3rd Battalion, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division.
 
Categories. African AmericansCemeteries & Burial SitesHeroesMilitaryWar, KoreanWar, World II
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 1,502 times since then and 95 times this year. Last updated on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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