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Near Gettysburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Third Brigade

Second Division - Third Corps

 

—Army of the Potomac —

 
Third Brigade, Second Division, Third Corps Tablet Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, November 11, 2008
1. Third Brigade, Second Division, Third Corps Tablet
The diamond symbol of the Third Corps appears at the top of the tablet.
Inscription.
Army of the Potomac
Third Corps Second Division
Third Brigade

Col. George C. Burling
2d. New Hampshire 5th. 6th. 7th. 8th. New Jersey
115th Pennsylvania Infantry.

July 2 Arrived between 9 and 10 a.m. and joined the Division. Between 2 and 3 p.m. advanced with the Division and was placed in reserve in rear of Second Brigade and soon thereafter ordered to First Division except that the 5th New Jersey supported Battery K 4th U.S. on the Emmitsburg Road. The 2d New Hampshire and 7th New Jersey reported to Brig. Gen. C. K. Graham and supported Batteries in the Peach Orchard the 63d Penna. on the left. The 6th New Jersey went to the support of Second Brigade First Division on its left in Plum Run Gorge near Devil's Den. The 8th New Jersey and 115 Penna. were sent to the Wheatfield to support the right of Second Brigade First Division. The Regiments of the Brigade were severally engaged where assigned and retired at the close of the day with the organizations with which they served.

July 3 In the morning rejoined the Division and was placed in reserve where apparently needed.

Casualties Killed 6 offices 53 men. Wounded 43 officers 333 men. Captured or missing 78 men. Total 513.
 
Erected 1912 by Gettysburg National Military Park Commission.
 
Location.
Burling's Brigade Tablet Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, November 11, 2008
2. Burling's Brigade Tablet
39° 47.758′ N, 77° 14.721′ W. Marker is near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in Adams County. Marker is on DeTrobriand Avenue, on the left when traveling east. Click for map. Located in the Wheatfield at Gettysburg National Military Park. Marker is in this post office area: Gettysburg PA 17325, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 8th New Jersey Volunteers (a few steps from this marker); Captain Jed. Chapman (within shouting distance of this marker); 115th Pennsylvania Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); 17th Maine Infantry (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); 110th Pennsylvania Infantry (about 300 feet away); 62nd Pennsylvania Infantry (about 400 feet away); a different marker also named Third Brigade (about 400 feet away); Captain Henry V. Fuller (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Gettysburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Wheatfield. National Park Service virtual tour stop. (Submitted on January 26, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Report of Col. George C. Burling. One senses some frustration in Burling's report, as his command was parceled out to other sectors, sometimes without his knowledge:
I now received orders from General Birney to detail two of my largest regiments to report to General Graham,
Burling's Brigade Reserve Position, Mid-Day July 2 Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, November 11, 2008
3. Burling's Brigade Reserve Position, Mid-Day July 2
Looking north at the intersection of Sickles Avenue with Wheatfield Road. Burling's Brigade was initially posted in the fields north of the Wheatfield as a reserve before individual regiments were posted about the III Corps salient in order to react to Confederate pressure.
in compliance with which I detailed the Second New Hampshire and Seventh New Jersey Volunteers. Shortly after this, I received orders from General Birney to detail the strongest regiment to report to General Humphreys for picket, in compliance with which I sent the Fifth New Jersey Volunteers, leaving me three small regiments. I was now ordered by General Birney to form a line across a small wheat-field on my left, to connect two brigades of the First Division. Before I had executed this order, I received an order from General Birney to send the largest regiment to General Ward's support, on my left, and while I was attending to that, the Eighth New Jersey Volunteers was taken from me without my knowledge, leaving me with the One hundred and fifteenth Pennsylvania Volunteers, numbering 140 muskets. My command being now all taken from me and separated, no two regiments being together, and being under the command of the different brigade commanders to whom they had reported, I, with my staff, reported to General Humphreys for instructions, remaining with him for some time.
(Submitted on January 26, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 731 times since then and 78 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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