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Near Gettysburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Second Brigade

First Division - Second Corps

 

—Army of the Potomac —

 
Second Brigade, First Division, Second Corps Tablet Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, November 11, 2008
1. Second Brigade, First Division, Second Corps Tablet
At the top is a trefoil representing the Second Corps.
Inscription.
Army of the Potomac
Second Corps First Division
Second Brigade

Col. Patrick Kelly
28th. Massachusetts
63d. (2 Cos.) 69th. (2 Cos.) 88th. (2 Cos.) New York
116th. (4 Cos.) Pennsylvania Infantry

July 2 Arrived at 7 a.m. and took position on line from Cemetery Hill to Round Top at the right of First Brigade. Between 5 and 6 p.m. went with Division to left. First Brigade on the left Third Brigade on right. Engaged the Confederate forces including Brig. Gen. Anderson's Brigade Major Gen. Hood's Division in the Wheatfield and forced them through the field southerly into woods beyond capturing many prisoners. The Fourth Brigade having advanced on the left this Brigade held its position until the Division being flanked on right and left retired and resumed former position in line of the Corps.

July 3 Constructed breastworks and remained entrenched until the close of the battle.

Casualties. Killed 1 officer 26 men. Wounded 4 officers 105 men. Captured or missing 2 officers 60 men. Total 198.
 
Erected 1912 by Gettysburg National Military Park Commission.
 
Location. 39° 47.849′ N, 77° 14.74′ W. Marker is near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in Adams County. Marker is on
28th Massachusetts Infantry Monument and Kelly's Brigade Tablet Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain
2. 28th Massachusetts Infantry Monument and Kelly's Brigade Tablet
Looking across Sickles Avenue at the monument and tablet location. This marked the right flank of Kelly's Brigade.
Sickles Avenue, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Located at the "Loop" on Stony Hill in Gettysburg National Military Park. Marker is in this post office area: Gettysburg PA 17325, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 28th Massachusetts Infantry (a few steps from this marker); 140th Pennsylvania Infantry (a few steps from this marker); 116th Pennsylvania Infantry (a few steps from this marker); 52nd New York Infantry (a few steps from this marker); 18th Massachusetts Volunteers (within shouting distance of this marker); Third Brigade (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named 140th Pennsylvania Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); 66th New York Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Gettysburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Wheatfield. National Park Service virtual tour stop. (Submitted on January 31, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Report of Col. Patrick Kelly. Col. Kelly summarized the fighting on Stony Hill in his report:
About 5 p.m. received orders to march by the left flank, which we did, preceded by the First Brigade. Both brigades advanced in line of battle through a wheat-field into a wood, in which was a considerable quantity of
63rd New York Infantry Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, April 4, 2009
3. 63rd New York Infantry
Marker stone for the position occupied by the 63rd New York Infantry. It reads "63 rd N.Y.I. Irish Brigade."
very large rocks, behind which they poured into us a brisk fire while advancing. We, however, drove them a considerable distance, and sent a great many prisoners to the rear. After being, I should think, about three-quarters of an hour engaged, the troops on our left had retired, and the enemy pressing hard on that point, on going to the right of the brigade I found the enemy forming line faced to our right along the edge of the wood. Finding myself in this very disagreeable position, I ordered the brigade to fall back, firing. We here encountered a most terrific fire, and narrowly escaped being captured. We, however, got out, reformed the brigade, and joined the division near the Second Division hospital. It was now after nightfall, and, soon after, we were moved to the front, and slept on our arms all night.
(Submitted on January 31, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
63rd New York Infantry Position Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, April 4, 2009
4. 63rd New York Infantry Position
The marker stone is just south of the main Irish Brigade monument along Sickles Avenue near the Loop.
The Irish Brigade on Stony Hill Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, April 4, 2009
5. The Irish Brigade on Stony Hill
The Irish Brigade advanced out of the Wheatfield into the woods which covered Stoney Hill (now the Loop on the park road). Their line faced to the northwest at an angle to Zook's Brigade (3rd Brigade, 1st Division, II Corps), and drove back Kershaw's Confederate Brigade. The Irish Brigade line advanced over the ground seen in this view, from left to right, then dressing with Zook's Brigade, faced west. When Wofford's Confederate Brigade attacked and turned Zook's right flank, the Irish Brigade fell back and reformed north of the Wheatfield.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 754 times since then and 97 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3, 4. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   5. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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