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Carlisle in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

1753 Carlisle Indian Conference

Walking Tour Stop 3

 
 
1753 Carlisle Indian Conference Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., January 29, 2009
1. 1753 Carlisle Indian Conference Marker
Inscription. The Native American tribes of Pennsylvania and Ohio, who had long traded with the English, asked for Pennsylvania's help to prevent French incursions and trade abuses in the Ohio territory. The Pennsylvania Assembly voted to give aid to the tribes and they agreed to meet in Carlisle to discuss affairs.

The Conference was held on the Square in Carlisle during the first week of October, 1753. Chiefs of the Six Nations and their allies the Delaware, Shawnee, Twightwee and Owendot met with Benjamin Franklin, Speaker of the Assembly Isaac Norris, and Secretary of the Provincial Council Richard Peters, all of whom represented Gov. Hamilton of Pennsylvania. Conrad Weiser and Andrew Montour acted as interpreters.

The first two days of the Conference were ceremonial, devoted to recently departed tribal chiefs and the formal distribution of gifts. On the third day the negotiations began.

Scarrooyada, who represented the Indians of the Six Nations, requested:
Better regulations of the fur trade on the Ohio
A limit of three trading posts (to be identified by the Indians)
Restriction of the sale of rum and whiskey to the Indians

The Indians received promises from the Pennsylvanians to honor their requests and the Indians, in turn, supplied valuable information about the movements of
Marker in Carlisle image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 7, 2010
2. Marker in Carlisle
the French in the Ohio Territory.
 
Erected by Historic Carlisle, Inc.
 
Location. 40° 12.106′ N, 77° 11.333′ W. Marker is in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, in Cumberland County. Marker is on Hanover Street (U.S. 11) just north of High Street, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is on Episcopal Square, just north of intersection of Hanover and High Streets. Marker is in this post office area: Carlisle PA 17013, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Episcopal Square (a few steps from this marker); The Return of the Captives (within shouting distance of this marker); First Presbyterian Church (within shouting distance of this marker); Shelling of Carlisle (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named First Presbyterian Church (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Shelling of Carlisle (within shouting distance of this marker); Forbes Trail (within shouting distance of this marker); Cumberland County (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Carlisle.
 
Also see . . .
1. A list of the conference participants. (Submitted on February 4, 2009, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. Historic Carlisle Inc. - recognizing and promoting the history of Carlisle, PA
1753 Carlisle Indian Conference Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., January 29, 2009
3. 1753 Carlisle Indian Conference Marker
St. John's Episcopal Church in background.
. (Submitted on February 27, 2009, by Alan Duxbury of Carlisle, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. Colonial EraNative AmericansNotable EventsNotable PersonsSettlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 999 times since then and 82 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.   2. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   3. submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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