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Carlisle in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Return of the Captives

Walking Tour Stop 1

 
 
The Return of the Captives Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., January 29, 2009
1. The Return of the Captives Marker
Inscription. Near Pittsburgh, on July 9, 1755, a French and Native American force decimated a small British and colonial army led by Edward Braddock, opening all of Pennsylvania to Indian raids. The Delaware tribe, under their leader Shingas, raided, killing and scalping settlers from Scranton to Virginia. They often took able-bodied settlers, including women and children, captive, weaving them into the fabric of their tribes. The raids reached Carlisle in January 1756 when nine settlers were killed and scalped about ten miles from this square. In November, raiders burned twenty-seven homes in the valley and killed or took captive fifty settlers. A truce was struck in 1758, but raids began again in 1764, and a girl named Dysart was murdered on July 6 near Big Spring. To end the raids, Colonel Henry Bouquet led a force of 1,500 men into Ohio, and the tribes sued for peace. Bouquet insisted on the return of all captured colonists. The tribes quickly complied, bringing nearly 200 captives to Fort Pitt. Bouquet brought many of them back to Carlisle. On December 31, 1764, here in the square, a large group of colonists looking for loved ones met them.

One captive was an 18 year-old girl who could not give her name. A German widow, Magdalena Hartman, thought she recognized her as Regina, one of two daughters lost during a raid near Selinsgrove
The Return of the Captives Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 7, 2010
2. The Return of the Captives Marker
in October 1755, but the girl gave no indication that she knew Magdalena. Perhaps at Colonel Bouquet's suggestion, the woman started to sing a hymn she had sung to her daughter at bedtime, “Allein und doch nicht ganz alleing bin ich.” (Alone and yet not alone am I). Regina recognized the song and began singing it too, thus providing the most poignant and best remembered of all the reunions of loved-ones long lost that took place that day here in this square.
 
Erected by Historic Carlisle, Inc.
 
Location. 40° 12.108′ N, 77° 11.354′ W. Marker is in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, in Cumberland County. Marker is on Hanover Street (U.S. 11), on the left when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is 100 feet north of intersection of Hanover and High Streets, next to First Presbyterian Church. Marker is in this post office area: Carlisle PA 17013, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 1753 Carlisle Indian Conference (within shouting distance of this marker); First Presbyterian Church (within shouting distance of this marker); Shelling of Carlisle (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named First Presbyterian Church
The Return of the Captives Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., January 29, 2009
3. The Return of the Captives Marker
First Presbyterian Church in background.
(within shouting distance of this marker); Episcopal Square (within shouting distance of this marker); Cumberland County Civil War Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Forbes Trail (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Shelling of Carlisle (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Carlisle.
 
Also see . . .  Historic Carlisle Inc. - recognizing and promoting the history of Carlisle, PA. (Submitted on February 27, 2009, by Alan Duxbury of Carlisle, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. Colonial EraForts, CastlesGovernmentMilitaryNative AmericansNotable EventsNotable PersonsSettlements & SettlersWar, French and Indian
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 969 times since then and 90 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.   2. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   3. submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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