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Carlisle in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Shelling of Carlisle

Walking Tour Stop 11

 
 
The Shelling of Carlisle Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., January 29, 2009
1. The Shelling of Carlisle Marker
Inscription. On June 27, 1863, a dusty column of 15,000 rebels led by General Richard Ewell marched up the road from Shippensburg into Carlisle. Foraging for supplies, they camped here until Tuesday, June 30. They departed that day, headed towards Mount Holley Springs. Other than the ample provisions they had taken, they left the community unscathed.

The next day, July 1, the townspeople cheered the arrival of Major General William Smith's four regiments of Federal militiamen, but their joy was short-lived. Late that afternoon, Major General J.E.B. Stuart and 3,500 rebel cavalrymen appeared at the intersection of York and Trindle roads. The rebels unlimbered their artillery, demanded the surrender of the town, and threatened to burn it. General Smith refused, the artillerymen let fly, and townspeople and militiamen alike scattered for shelter. Over the next few hours, shells struck the columns of the courthouse, blew holes in the Presbyterian and Episcopal churches, damaged numerous other properties, and wounded a few unlucky souls near the square, including twelve militiamen. After setting fire to the U.S. Army's Carlisle Barracks, Stuart's men disappeared to the south, ordered to Gettysburg. The threat had ended.

Although most of the damage done by the rebel shells was long ago repaired, scars can still be seen here on the facade of
The Shelling of Carlisle Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., January 29, 2009
2. The Shelling of Carlisle Marker
Marker is snowcovered. Cumberland County marker to right and courthouse in background.
the Old Court House. You can still see where a pillar was chipped and bricks were broken by flying shrapnel.
 
Erected by Historic Carlisle, Inc.
 
Location. 40° 12.076′ N, 77° 11.357′ W. Marker is in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, in Cumberland County. Marker is at the intersection of Hanover Street (State Highway 34) and High Street (U.S. 11), on the right when traveling south on Hanover Street. Click for map. Marker is just north of the county courthouse. Marker is in this post office area: Carlisle PA 17013, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Cumberland County (here, next to this marker); Forbes Trail (here, next to this marker); China Burma India Veteran's Memorial (a few steps from this marker); Carlisle Public Square (a few steps from this marker); Cumberland County Civil War Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Market House Square (within shouting distance of this marker); First Presbyterian Church (within shouting distance of this marker); Carlisle Court House (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Carlisle.
 
Also see . . .  Historic Carlisle Inc. - recognizing and promoting the history of Carlisle, PA. (Submitted on February 27, 2009, by Alan Duxbury of Carlisle, Pennsylvania.)
The Shelling of Carlisle Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 7, 2010
3. The Shelling of Carlisle Marker
Marker can be seen on the left in the photo.

 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Damaged Courthouse Column image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., January 29, 2009
4. Damaged Courthouse Column
Damaged Courthouse Window Sill image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., January 29, 2009
5. Damaged Courthouse Window Sill
"July 1, 1863" engraved in bricks.
The Shelling of Carlisle Illustration image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., January 29, 2009
6. The Shelling of Carlisle Illustration
"'This illustration of the Shelling of Carlisle was drawn by the famous caricaturist Thomas Nast and published in Harper's Weekly magazine.' Courtesy of the Cumberland County Historical Society."
Major General J.E.B. Stuart image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., January 29, 2009
7. Major General J.E.B. Stuart
"'On the march into Pennsylvania Major Gen. James Ewell Brown Stuart became separated from the main rebel army and came to Carlisle looking for it. He was killed leading his men at the Battle of Yellow Tavern in May 1864. Courtesy of George Bradley.'"
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 1,288 times since then and 180 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.   3. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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