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Near Gettysburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

First Brigade

First Division - Sixth Corps

 

—Army of the Potomac —

 
First Brigade, First Division, Sixth Corps Tablet image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, December 27, 2008
1. First Brigade, First Division, Sixth Corps Tablet
The Greek Cross of the Sixth Corps appears at the top of the tablet.
Inscription.
Army of the Potomac
Sixth Corps First Division
First Brigade

Brig. Gen. Alfred T.A. Torbert
1st. 2d. 3d. 15th. New Jersey Infantry

July 2 Arrived at 4 p.m. from Manchester Md. a distance by the route taken of about 35 miles having halted an hour only. After sunset moved to the last slope of the north side of Little Round Top and arrived there at dark was held in reserve until morning.

July 3 Moved to a position southwest of the Weikert house and remained until the close of the battle not engaged except on the skirmish line.

Casualties. Wounded 11 men.
 
Erected 1912 by Gettysburg National Military Park Commission.
 
Location. 39° 48.037′ N, 77° 14.059′ W. Marker is near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in Adams County. Marker is on Sedgwick Avenue, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Located on the south part of Cemetery Ridge in Gettysburg National Military Park. Marker is in this post office area: Gettysburg PA 17325, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Third Division (within shouting distance of this marker); 1st New Jersey Brigade (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Sixth Corps
Torbert's Brigade Tablet image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, December 27, 2008
2. Torbert's Brigade Tablet
Next to the tablet is the left flank marker stone for the 3rd New Jersey Infantry.
(about 300 feet away); Artillery Brigade (about 500 feet away); Battery G, 1st New York Light Artillery (about 800 feet away); Dow's 6th Maine Battery (approx. 0.2 miles away); Reverend Father William Corby, C.S.C. (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named First Brigade (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Gettysburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. Cemetery Ridge. National Park Service virtual tour stop. (Submitted on February 5, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Reports of Brig. Gen. Alfred T. A. Torbert. General Torbert stated his brigade began the march to Gettysburg at 10 p.m. on July 1, marching through the morning to arrive in the afternoon of July 2:
On the night of July 1, about 10 o clock, the brigade started from near Manchester, Md., for Gettysburg. The distance by the route we marched was about 35 miles, and we made it by 4 p.m. on the 2d, only stopping an hour, about 1 p.m. on the 2d, to make coffee. We rested near the battle-field about two hours, when we were ordered to the left of the line, where we arrived about dark, with only 25
New Jersey Brigade Position image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, December 27, 2008
3. New Jersey Brigade Position
Looking over a stone wall running from the tablet location to the northeast. The intersection of Sedgwick and United States Avenues is in the distance. The brigade formed more or less a diamond shaped defense on a high point along the Federal lines. The 2nd New Jersey occupied the line in along this section of the wall. The 3rd New Jersey stood to their left at an angle, facing west. The 1st New Jersey was on the east side of the diamond. And the 15th New Jersey was on the south side, completing the formation.
men absent, and they came up by the morning. The brigade was held in this position in reserve till morning.
(Submitted on February 5, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
New Jersey Brigade's Stone Wall image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, December 27, 2008
4. New Jersey Brigade's Stone Wall
Another view of the wall used by the 2nd New Jersey.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 638 times since then and 69 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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