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Richmond, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
Confederate Memorial Chapel
 
Confederate Memorial Chapel Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Bernard Fisher, February 7, 2009
1. Confederate Memorial Chapel Marker
 
Inscription. The chapel was erected in 1887 in memory of the more than 260,000 Confederate war dead and as a place of worship for the veterans who resided here in the Robert E. Lee Camp Confederate Soldiers' Home. The veterans themselves, many of them disabled and impoverished, funded the construction. Marion J. Dimmock, Sr., designed the Gothic Revival structure and Joseph F. Wingfield built it. The chapel was used regularly until the last resident veteran died in 1941. The home was then closed and the buildings were demolished, except for the chapel and the Robinson House, the superintendent's dwelling. The chapel was restored in 1960-1961.
 
Erected 1999 by Department of Historic Resources. (Marker Number SA 52.)
 
Location. 37° 33.343′ N, 77° 28.569′ W. Marker is in Richmond, Virginia. Marker is on Grove Avenue 0.1 miles west of North Boulevard, on the right when traveling west. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2900 Grove Avenue, Richmond VA 23221, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Confederate Memorial Chapel (a few steps from this marker); Residential Life at R. E. Lee Camp, No.1 (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Robinson House (about 700 feet away); Arnold’s Picket Driven In (approx. 0.2 miles away); Virginia Historical Society (approx. ¼ mile away); Memorial Bell Tower (approx. 0.4 miles away); Stonewall Jackson (approx. 0.4 miles away); Maury (approx. half a mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Richmond.
 
Confederate Memorial Chapel Photo, Click for full size
By Bernard Fisher, February 7, 2009
2. Confederate Memorial Chapel
 

 
Also see . . .
1. Civil War Traveler. City of Richmond (Submitted on February 12, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.) 

2. Confederate War Memorial Chapel, Richmond. The Chapel Web Site is dedicated to; the veterans of the R. E. Lee Camp No. 1 C.V. Soldiers' Home, the study of the chapel and the relationship with the Soldiers' Home, a collection of articles - stories - and writings from journals, ledgers, and writings about the Veterans, who made the Chapel their source of sanctuary. (Submitted on April 1, 2010, by Bobby J. Edwards of Yorktown, Virginia.) 

3. Confederate Memorial Chapel (pdf file). National Register of Historic Places (Submitted on June 26, 2010, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.) 
 
Chapel Pews and Gothic Stained Glass Windows Photo, Click for full size
By Bobby J. Edwards, March 20, 2010
3. Chapel Pews and Gothic Stained Glass Windows
Chapel Pews are dark brown Oak benches, and wrap in a curved pattern to the center. The stained glass windows are remarkable works of art and are true memorials to different Confederate Officers, with one Californian and other Virginians.
 
 
Confederate Memorial Chapel Arches, Dedication to 260,000 Confederate Dead Photo, Click for full size
By Bobby J. Edwards, March 20, 2010
4. Confederate Memorial Chapel Arches, Dedication to 260,000 Confederate Dead
The Confederate War Memorial Chapel, built from the efforts of war veterans was dedicated to the 260,000 Confederate Dead. The 3 Church Arches Speak to that dedication. The Veterans inscribed in gold gilt lettering on the Chapel Chancel Arch,
“In memory of the Confederate dead
In this place I will give thee peace
Saith the Lord of Host”
 
 
Robert E. Lee Camp Marker. Photo, Click for full size
By Bernard Fisher, July 3, 2009
5. Robert E. Lee Camp Marker.
The Virginia Museum of Fine Arts occupies the site of the Robert E. Lee Camp Confederate Soldier's Home.
 
 
Surviving building of the Confederate Soldier's Home. Photo, Click for full size
By Bernard Fisher, July 3, 2009
6. Surviving building of the Confederate Soldier's Home.
 
 
Headquarters, The Soldier's Home, Richmond, Va. Photo, Click for full size
By Hugh C. Leighton Co., circa 1908
7. Headquarters, The Soldier's Home, Richmond, Va.
VCU Libraries Digital Collections - Rarely Seen Richmond
 
 
R.E. Lee Camp, Confederate Home, Richmond, Va. Photo, Click for full size
By Detroit Publishing Co.
8. R.E. Lee Camp, Confederate Home, Richmond, Va.
VCU Libraries Digital Collections - Rarely Seen Richmond
 
 
Confederate Memorial Chapel - Inside Gothic Door Photo, Click for full size
By Bobby J. Edwards, March 20, 2010
9. Confederate Memorial Chapel - Inside Gothic Door
Right exit Gothic designed Door of the Confederate War Memorial Chapel. Much of the Chapel Wood cut from the Grove of Oak Trees on the Soldiers Home Campus.
 
 
Memorial Chapel Mason and Hamlin Organ Photo, Click for full size
By Bobby J. Edwards, March 20, 2010
10. Memorial Chapel Mason and Hamlin Organ
The Mason and Hamlin Organ still works, and for special events such as Confederate Memorial Day Services, the Organ is played.
 
 
Confederate Memorial Chapel Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Bobby J. Edwards, April 15, 2010
11. Confederate Memorial Chapel Marker
To The Glory of God And in Memory of Members of R. E. LEE CAMP No. 1 United Confederate Veterans Who Owned The Soil Here Had Their Abode in This Area Worshipped and Were Buried From This Chapel With Affectionate Dedication By United Daughters of The Confederacy - 1960
 
 
42-pdr Seacoast Gun - Rifled and Banded Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, February 27, 2011
12. 42-pdr Seacoast Gun - Rifled and Banded
Displayed in front of the chapel is this seacoast gun, used by the Confederates during the Civil War. Originally cast by West Point Foundry, New York in 1856. During the war, Confederates had the gun rifled with a wrought iron reinforcing band added for strength. The muzzle was also trimmed down (possibly for use in ironclad ships). The gun saw service at Fort Sumter, South Carolina, and was recovered there in the 20th century.
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on February 6, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,556 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on February 6, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.   3, 4. submitted on April 1, 2010, by Bobby J. Edwards of Yorktown, Virginia.   5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on July 4, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.   9, 10. submitted on April 1, 2010, by Bobby J. Edwards of Yorktown, Virginia.   11. submitted on April 28, 2010, by Bobby J. Edwards of Yorktown, Virginia.   12. submitted on February 28, 2011, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
 
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