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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Conestee in Greenville County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Beaver at Lake Conestee

 
 
Beaver at Lake Conestee Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, February 6, 2009
1. Beaver at Lake Conestee Marker
Inscription.
Beaver (Castor canadensis) inhabited the Conestee area long before the arrival of Europeans in the 18th century. Their numerous dams throughout the Park have inundated much of the former lake bed, creating wetlands which provide habitat for wildlife and filtration to purify the waters of the streams and creeks flowing into the Park. Animals dependent on these wetlands include muskrats, river otters, turtles, frogs, water snakes, fish, dukes, geese, herons, and other birds.

A careful observer can also see other signs of beaver activity near the trails along the wetlands, such as stumps of beaver gnaw marks. the "skeletons" of dead trees in the wetlands indicate that the beaver dams have flooded former bottomland forests, drowning the tree roots and killing the trees.

Beavers live in mud and branch lodges located in or at the edge of their ponds. Lodge entrances are generally under water to provide protection from predators. Some beaver dams in the Park are hundreds of feet long and raise the pond level behind the dam as much as 3 feet. Like the lodges, the dams are constructed of sticks and small trees harvested by the beavers and bound solidly together with mud.

Beaver can grow to a length of approximately 4 feet, including their broad flat tails, and can weigh more than 50 lbs. Mating for
Birds of the Conestee Wetlands Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, February 6, 2009
2. Birds of the Conestee Wetlands Marker
From this observation deck, visitors may commonly see the birds illustrated here. All are dependent on the surrounding wetlands for their food source.
Great Blue Heron: This stately heron stands nearly 4 feet tall with a 6-foot wing span. It is usually seen standing patiently at water's edge watching for fish or frogs, its principal food, or perched on tree branches near the water.
Belted Kingfisher: Found throughout most of the U.S. and Canada, the Kingfisher feeds by plunging into the water from a perch on a branch or after hovering in the air over the water. Its scratchy, rattling call is often heard before the bird is seen.
Mallard: The most abundant duck in North America, the Mallard feeds by "dabbing", dipping its head deeply into the water and lifting its tail end up into the air. The male, with his bright green head, contrasts sharply with the mottled brown female.
Wood Duck: Nesting in elevated tree cavities or nesting boxes, this duck feeds by either picking food off the water surface or submerging its head. It often perches on logs in the water or high on tree limbs. The very brightly colored male attracts more attention than the female who is rather gray with a white patch around the eye.
Canada Goose: Known for its loud musical honking and V-shaped flying formation, the Canada Goose thrives throughout most of North America. They often fly out to forage in fields during the day and return to the protection of the wetlands in the evening.
Red-shouldered Hawk: This colorful hawk, found in many different habitats, prefers low marshy woodlands. It generally hunts by watching from a low perch on a sturdy limb, often at the water's edge, darting down to catch snakes, frogs, and small mammals.
life, both parents care for the one to four young (kits) that are born in the spring. They are nocturnal animals, working and feeding at night; therefore, they are rarely seen during the day.
 
Erected 2006 by Lake Conestee Nature Park.
 
Location. 34° 46.583′ N, 82° 21.283′ W. Marker is in Conestee, South Carolina, in Greenville County. Marker is on Fork Shoals Road. Click for map. Marker is located in Lake Conestee Nature Park, on the Main Observation Deck. Marker is in this post office area: Conestee SC 29636, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Lake Conestee in Transition (here, next to this marker); Reedy River Factory (approx. 0.7 miles away); McBee Chapel (approx. 0.7 miles away); Donaldson Air Force Base / Captain John O. Donaldson (approx. 1.7 miles away); a different marker also named Donaldson Air Force Base / Captain John O. Donaldson (approx. 2.1 miles away); Laurel Creek Church (approx. 2.7 miles away); Mauldin United Methodist Church (approx. 2.7 miles away); The History of the Gosnell Cabin (approx. 2.7 miles away); Mauldin (approx. 2.8 miles away); Herbert C. Granger Interchange (approx. 3.6 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Conestee.
 
Also see . . .
Beaver Dam West of the Observation Deck image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, February 6, 2009
3. Beaver Dam West of the Observation Deck

1. Lake Conestee Nature Park. Lake Conestee Nature Park consists of approximately 400 acres of beautiful natural habitat on the Reedy River just 6 miles south of downtown Greenville, South Carolina. (Submitted on February 7, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Conestee Foundation. The Conestee Foundation, a 501(c)(3) conservation organization, was established in 2000 to spearhead the revitalization of the Reedy River properties and surrounding community directly downstream of the City of Greenville. (Submitted on February 7, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. AnimalsNatural Resources
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,138 times since then and 54 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   2. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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