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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Downtown in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

St. Patrick's Parish

Erected about 1792

 
 
St. Patrick's Parish Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Richard E. Miller, February 7, 2009
1. St. Patrick's Parish Marker
Inscription.
First church to be erected in the "Federal City" outside the limits of "George Towne." First pastor, Rev. Anthony Caffrey, brought from Dublin at suggestion of James Hoban, architect of the "Presidential Palace."
March 17, 1953.
 
Erected 1953.
 
Location. 38° 53.888′ N, 77° 1.545′ W. Marker is in Downtown, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is on 10th Street, NW, on the left when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is near the church entrance between F and G Steets, NW. Marker is at or near this postal address: 619 10th Street, NW, Washington DC 20001, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Old Carroll Hall (within shouting distance of this marker); Woodies Comes to F Street (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); John Wilkes Booth's Escape (about 400 feet away); John J. Donovan, Jr. (about 400 feet away); Abraham Lincoln (about 600 feet away); The Restoration of 800 F Street (about 700 feet away); The Christian Index (about 700 feet away); Bill W. and Dr. Bob (about 800 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Downtown.
 
Also see . . .
1. Saint Patrick Catholic Church. ... The first American
St. Patrick's Parish Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, May 22, 2008
2. St. Patrick's Parish Marker
to be ordained a priest in the United States, Fr. William Matthews, was named pastor in 1804. This multi-talented clergyman occupied the post for fifty years, during which time he was also President of Georgetown University, Administrator of the Philadelphia Diocese, co-founder of the D.C. Public Library, long-time member of the D.C. Public School Board, as well as founder or promoter of innumerable institutions (e.g. Gonzaga College, Visitation Convent, and St. Vincent's Orphan Asylum). As the "Catholic Patriarch of Washington," Father Matthews was on close terms with Washington notables such as Henry Clay and Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney; Presidents Zachery Taylor and John Quincy Adams attended parish events. ... (Submitted on February 7, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.) 

2. Irish-American Historic Places. The 1850's brought waves of new Catholic immigrants; the Civil War ... burgeoning numbers of troops, some 50,000 wounded soldiers and new government employees. The parish under Father Jacob Walter, its fourth pastor, undertook its new challenges with vigor ... [E]specially outspoken in the defense of Mary Surratt, a parish member who was convicted of complicity in Lincoln's assassination, ... the pastor stood beside her on the gallows at her execution. It was under Father Walter's
St. Patrick's R.C. Church Photo, Click for full size
By Richard E. Miller, February 7, 2009
3. St. Patrick's R.C. Church
present edifice constructed 1872-1884. The marker is visible above sidewalk, center-left.
direction that the present gothic church was begun in 1872 and finally dedicated in 1884. The grand church quickly became the venue for national and international events, most notably the First National Eucharistic Congress in 1895. At the same time the parish was fast becoming the "downtown" church of a thriving commercial area. (Submitted on February 7, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.) 
 
Additional keywords. Roman Catholic; Irish-American; Mt. Olivet Cemetery; Fr. William Matthews; Fr. Jacob Walter; Mary Surratt.
 
Categories. Churches, Etc.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 1,263 times since then and 82 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   2. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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