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Ava in Noble County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Crash of the USS Shenandoah / Lighter-Than-Air Flight

 
 
Crash of the USS Shenandoah Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., December 23, 2008
1. Crash of the USS Shenandoah Marker
Inscription.
Crash of the USS Shenandoah
September 3, 1925
On a stormy autumn morning in 1925, the giant Navy airship, christened Shenandoah, crashed near this site. Initially, the Shenandoah was commissioned to perform scouting missions for the Navy; however, she would soon be flying promotional missions. The Shenandoah had recently begun a six-day publicity tour across the Midwest when she crashed. The turbulent weather of late summer created strong winds, which ripped the 680-feet long Shenandoah in two and tore the control car from the keel. A majority of the 14 crewmen who died in the crash, including the captain, Lt. Commander Zachary Lansdowne of Greenville, Ohio, were killed when the control car plummeted to the ground. The stern section fell in a valley near Ava and the bow was carried southwest nearly twelve miles before landing near Sharon, Ohio. The Ohio National Guard was called in to control the crowds of spectators who traveled to the crash sites.

Lighter-Than-Air Flight
The USS Shenandoah was America's first rigid dirigible and was launched in 1923 at the height of the worldwide enthusiasm for lighter-than-air flight. By the early 1920s, Germany, Great Britain, Italy, and France all had airships, some suffered tragic
Lighter-Than-Air Flight Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., December 23, 2008
2. Lighter-Than-Air Flight Marker
crashes. In efforts to improve on the safety of European made airships, the Shenandoah was designed to be filled with nonflammable helium instead of hydrogen and became the first rigid dirigible in the world to use helium. One year after her initial flight, the Shenandoah successfully crossed the United States logging 235 hours of flight time. With the crash of the Shenandoah and two other American airships, the Akron and the Macon, the future of rigid dirigibles was uncertain. In 1937, the fiery crash of the German airship Hindenburg brought an abrupt end to the era of the great airships.
 
Erected 2002 by Ohio Bicentennial Commission, The Longaberger Company, Shenandoah Commemoration Committee, and The Ohio Historical Society. (Marker Number 2-61.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Ohio Historical Society / The Ohio History Connection marker series.
 
Location. 39° 49.843′ N, 81° 34.445′ W. Marker is in Ava, Ohio, in Noble County. Marker is at the intersection of Marietta Road (Ohio Route 821) and Rayner Road, on the right when traveling south on Marietta Road. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 50495 Ohio Route 821, Ava OH 43711, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least
Crash of the USS Shenandoah / Lighter-Than-Air Flight Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., December 23, 2008
3. Crash of the USS Shenandoah / Lighter-Than-Air Flight Marker
8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. U.S.S. Shenandoah (approx. half a mile away); a different marker also named U.S.S. Shenandoah (approx. 2 miles away); Claude L. Wilson (approx. 3 miles away); John Gray (approx. 4.8 miles away); Wreck of the Shenandoah (approx. 5.7 miles away); a different marker also named U.S.S. Shenandoah (approx. 6.3 miles away); VFW Post #4721 Veterans Memorial (approx. 6.4 miles away); Noble County Veterans Memorial (approx. 6.5 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Ava.
 
Also see . . .  USS Shenandoah's Last Flight. Port engines, up flank speed!' It was 3:30 a.m. on September 3, 1925, and in the control cabin of the huge cigar-shaped dirigible Shenandoah its skipper, U.S. Navy Lieutenant Commander Zachary Lansdowne, was worried. It was proving increasingly difficult to keep the 690-foot airship steady in the mounting turbulence over southeastern Ohio. 'Starboard engines, hold standard,' called Lansdowne. 'Valve cells four and five.'... (Submitted on November 25, 2013, by James King of San Miguel, California.) 
 
Categories. 20th CenturyAir & SpaceDisastersNotable Events
 
Crash of the <i>USS Shenandoah</i> / Lighter-Than-Air Flight Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, February 11, 2016
4. Crash of the USS Shenandoah / Lighter-Than-Air Flight Marker
Crash of the <i>USS Shenandoah</i> image. Click for full size.
By Jessica Tiderman, September 3, 1925
5. Crash of the USS Shenandoah
[Hand written on the back of photo:]
East Side
Crash of the <i>USS Shenandoah</i> image. Click for full size.
By Jessica Tiderman, September 3, 1925
6. Crash of the USS Shenandoah
[Hand Written on back of photo:]
North West End
Postcard of crash of the <i>USS Shenandoah</i> image. Click for full size.
By Jessica Tiderman, June 1, 2009
7. Postcard of crash of the USS Shenandoah
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 2,070 times since then and 154 times this year. This page was the Marker of the Week Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.   4. submitted on , by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.   5, 6, 7. submitted on , by Jessica Tiderman of Hamler, Ohio. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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