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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Chester in Chesterfield County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Half-Way House

Butler’s Headquarters

 

—Bermuda Hundred Campaign —

 
Half-Way House Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Bernard Fisher, February 9, 2009
1. Half-Way House Marker
Inscription. As Grant grappled with Lee in the Wilderness and near Spotsylvania Court House in May 1864, Union Gen. Benjamin Butler landed with 30,000 troops at Bermuda Hundred, eight miles east of here. Butler’s objective was to open another front and to threaten Richmond from the south.

This building dates from 1760 and was a prominent landmark during the campaign’s battle of Drewry’s Bluff on May 16. The Half-Way (between Petersburg and Richmond) House was used by Butler during the fighting.

Early in the battle, Confederate artillery located north of here found the range. Shells shattered brick dependencies and plowed up the grounds around the building. Before the battle soldiers had helped themselves to the contents of the house, leaving the place “pretty well rummaged.”

Butler’s defeated Army of the James rallied around the Half-Way House on the afternoon of the 16th. Eventually order emerged from the chaos. The strong Union position here halted the Confederate attack and ended the battle.

The fighting at Drewry’s Bluff marked the end of Butler’s offensive operations against Richmond.
 
Erected by Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Virginia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location.
Map of the area Photo, Click for full size
By Bernard Fisher, February 9, 2009
2. Map of the area
37° 23.139′ N, 77° 25.461′ W. Marker is near Chester, Virginia, in Chesterfield County. Marker is at the intersection of Jefferson Davis Highway (U.S. 1) and Wonderview Drive, on the right when traveling north on Jefferson Davis Highway. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 10301 Jefferson Davis Highway, Richmond VA 23237, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Halfway House (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Half-Way House (within shouting distance of this marker); Into the "Bottle" (approx. 0.4 miles away); Proctor's Creek Fight (approx. 0.4 miles away); Second Battle of Drewry's Bluff (approx. 0.8 miles away); Drewry’s Bluff Battlefield (approx. 0.8 miles away); Osbornes (approx. 1.2 miles away); Farrar's Island (approx. 1.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Chester.
 
More about this marker. On the upper left is a photo of “Union General Benjamin Butler”. On the lower left is a period sketch with the caption, “The Half-Way House as sketched by a traveling artist in 1866”. On the lower right is map of the surrounding area. The map carries the caption, “From the Half-Way House, Butler’s infantry marched south and then east,
Half-Way House CWT Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Bernard Fisher, February 9, 2009
3. Half-Way House CWT Marker
back into the safety of the Bermuda Hundred peninsula”.

 
Also see . . .
1. CWSAC Battle Summary. Proctor's Creek (Submitted on February 11, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.) 

2. Half-Way House Restaurant. (Submitted on February 11, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.)
3. Civil War Traveler. Chesterfield County (Submitted on February 12, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Half-Way House Photo, Click for full size
By Bernard Fisher, February 9, 2009
4. Half-Way House
Half-Way House (rear view) Photo, Click for full size
By Bernard Fisher, February 9, 2009
5. Half-Way House (rear view)
Half-Way House Out Building Photo, Click for full size
By Bernard Fisher, February 9, 2009
6. Half-Way House Out Building
This old log building was the operating kitchen for the Inn/restaurant, and all food was transported in silver serving dishes on trays by white-gloved waiters across the then brick-paved area between the two buildings.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,696 times since then and 56 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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