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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Carlisle in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Carlisle Barracks

 
 
Carlisle Barracks Marker Photo, Click for full size
By William Fischer, Jr., January 29, 2009
1. Carlisle Barracks Marker
Inscription. Second oldest army post in U.S. A powder magazine built by Hessian prisoners, 1777, survives. Burned by Confederates, July 1, 1863. Indian School, 1879-1918. Army Medical Field Service School, 1920-1946.
 
Erected 1947 by Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission.
 
Location. 40° 12.757′ N, 77° 10.715′ W. Marker is in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, in Cumberland County. Marker is at the intersection of Hanover Street (U.S. 11) and Ashburn Drive, on the right when traveling south on Hanover Street. Click for map. Marker is 100 feet north of the Ashburn Gate entrance to the US Army's Carlisle Barracks. Marker is in this post office area: Carlisle PA 17013, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Carlisle (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Charles Albert "Chief" Bender (approx. 0.3 miles away); The Hessian Powder Magazine (approx. 0.4 miles away); Indian Cemetery (approx. half a mile away); The Carlisle Indian Industrial School (approx. half a mile away); Marianne Moore (approx. 0.7 miles away); 54th & 55th Massachusetts Infantry (approx. 0.8 miles away); Memorial Park (approx. 0.8 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Carlisle.
 
Also see . . .
Carlisle Barracks Marker Photo, Click for full size
By William Fischer, Jr., January 29, 2009
2. Carlisle Barracks Marker
 Carlisle Barracks History. The post is now home to the U.S. Army War College. (Submitted on February 13, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. EducationMilitaryNative AmericansWar, US CivilWar, US RevolutionaryWar, World II
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Fort Scott, Kansas. This page has been viewed 1,121 times since then and 100 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Fort Scott, Kansas. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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