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Near Gettysburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

71st Pennsylvania Volunteers

2nd Brigade, 2nd Division

 

2nd Corps

 
71st Pennsylvania Volunteers Monument Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, December 27, 2008
1. 71st Pennsylvania Volunteers Monument
Inscription. (Front):
California Regiment

71 Pennsylvania Vols.
commanded by
Col. R. Penn Smith
carried into action
24 officers 307 enlisted men
casualties
Killed 2 officers 19 enlisted men
Wounded 3 officers 55 enlisted men
Missing 3 officers 16 enlisted men
Total 98.

2. Brig. 2. Div. 2. Corps.

(Back):
Philadelphia Brigade

To the left of this point on July 2 the 71. Penna. assisted in repulsing the furious attack of Wright's Ga. Brig. During the terrific cannonading of July 3, the Regiment occupied a position 60 yards in the rear of this spot. A number of the men voluntarily helping to work Cushing's disabled battery. As the enemy emerged from Seminary Ridge the Regiment was ordered forward. The left wing to this point, the right to the walls in the rear. When Pickett's Division pushed upon the left wing in overwhelming numbers, it fell back into line with the right, thus bringing the whole regiment into action. With the additional use of a large number of loaded muskets gathered from the battle-field of the previous day. The Regiment captured a number of prisoners and three flags.

(Left):
Patriotism

This Regiment was organized April 29, 1861. Being the first 3 year regiment to complete its organization, it was enlisted in
Front of Monument Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, December 27, 2008
2. Front of Monument
At the top of the monument is the trefoil symbol of Second Corps. The coat of arms of Pennsylvania appears below.
Philadelphia by Senator E.D. Baker and Isaac J. Wistar by special authority from the War Department to be credited to the State of California and was known as the "California Regiment." After the death of Colonel E.D. Baker at Ball's Bluff, Oct. 21, 1861, it was claimed by its native state and became the 71. Pennsylvania.

(Right):
Heroism


The 71. Pennsylvania participated in all the principal battles of the Army of the Potomac and most of the minor ones until mustered out at the expiration of its term of service July 2, 1864. It numbered during its service nearly 2300 men. The total loss during that period being about 1800.
 
Erected 1887 by Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.
 
Location. 39° 48.802′ N, 77° 14.179′ W. Marker is near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in Adams County. Marker is on Hancock Avenue, on the left when traveling north. Click for map. Located at the "Angle" on Cemetery Ridge in Gettysburg National Military Park. Marker is in this post office area: Gettysburg PA 17325, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Angle (a few steps from this marker); 72nd Pennsylvania Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); Brigadier General Lewis Armistead, C.S.A.
Back of Monument Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, December 27, 2008
3. Back of Monument
(within shouting distance of this marker); Battery A, Fourth U.S. Artillery (within shouting distance of this marker); Lt. Alonzo Cushing (within shouting distance of this marker); Twenty-Sixth North Carolina Regiment (within shouting distance of this marker); Pettigrew and Trimble's Attack (within shouting distance of this marker); Battlefield Landmarks - West and North (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Gettysburg.
 
Also see . . .  71st Pennsylvania Infantry. Service history of the regiment. (Submitted on February 13, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Left Side of Monument Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, December 27, 2008
4. Left Side of Monument
Right Side of Monument Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, December 27, 2008
5. Right Side of Monument
71st Pennsylvania Monument at the Angle Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, December 27, 2008
6. 71st Pennsylvania Monument at the Angle
Looking from near Cushing's Battery to the west down the stone wall. The stone walls form the "angle" which was bitterly contested during the repulse of Longstreet's assault on July 3.
Left Flank of the 71st Pennsylvania Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, December 27, 2008
7. Left Flank of the 71st Pennsylvania
Looking from the regiment's left flank marker stone toward the monument and the angle. The regiment's initial position was to the rear of Cushing's battery. When the Confederate infantry advanced, the 71st moved forward into the angle to repulse the attack. Garnett's and then Armistead's Confederate Brigades charged the angle with the latter actually crossing the stone wall.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 843 times since then and 59 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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