Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Oriskany in Oneida County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The military road and the ravine

 

ó12th stop on the walking tour ó

 
The military road and the ravine Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bryan Olson,
1. The military road and the ravine Marker
Inscription.
The military road
On August 6, 1777, the Tryon County militia marched down a wilderness road that entered this ravine. A “corduroy” road, made of logs, it was the only means by which General Herkimer and his men could reach Fort Stanwix other than by boat.

and the ravine
The Military Road dipped more than fifty feet into this marshy ravine. A small stream, barely three-feet wide, meandered along the bottom. It was a splendid spot for an ambush. While 50 of Sir Johnsonís Royal Greens waited behind a rise, 400 Iroquois, led by Mohawk chief Joseph Brant, concealed themselves on both sides of the ravine. It was into this trap that General Herkimerís militiamen advanced, with Herkimer at the head of the column.
 
Erected by New York State Park.
 
Location. Marker has been confirmed missing. It was likely located near 43° 10.505′ N, 75° 22.08′ W. Marker was in Oriskany, New York, in Oneida County. Click for map. This marker is located inside Oriskany Battlefield Park on a walking path that runs thru the ravine where the initial ambush took place. Marker was in this post office area: Oriskany NY 13424, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within
The military road and the ravine Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 15, 2010
2. The military road and the ravine Marker
View of the historical marker with the number twelve on it's support stand, indicating that this marker is the 8th stop on the Oriskany Battlefield walking tour.
walking distance of this location. The Ambush (within shouting distance of this marker but has been reported missing); General Herkimer's Troops (within shouting distance of this marker); Campaign of 1777 (within shouting distance of this marker but has been reported missing); Ambush Started Here (within shouting distance of this marker); To The Unknown Patriotic Soldiers of Tryon County (within shouting distance of this marker); The Military Road (within shouting distance of this marker); Preserving a Memorial Park (within shouting distance of this marker); The Ambush: August 6, 1777 (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line). Click for a list of all markers in Oriskany.
 
More about this marker. This marker has two images on. The first image is of Mohawk Chief Joseph Brant. The second image is of the old Military Road.

This historical marker is the 12th stop in a walking tour of the Oriskany Battlefield.
 
Regarding The military road and the ravine. The Battle of Oriskany is one of the bloodies battles of the American Revolution. To learn more about the battle I recommend the book: Liberty March, The Battle of Oriskany by Allan D. Foot.
 
Also see . . .
1. Oriskany Battlefield State Historic Site web site. (Submitted on February 13, 2009, by Bryan Olson of Syracuse, New York.)
The military road and the ravine Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 15, 2010
3. The military road and the ravine Marker
View of the footbridge crossing the creek where the ambush takes place. Just beyond the footbridge and partially up the old military trail there is a view of the historical marker that is featured on this page.

2. The battle of Oriskany on Wikipedia. (Submitted on February 13, 2009, by Bryan Olson of Syracuse, New York.)
 
Additional comments.
1. Removal of weathered historical markers
I stopped by this historic site on my journey to visit with my daughter's family in Connecticut. Upon arriving at in the parking area I noticed that there were some new markers, so I took the full walking tour and noticed several changes to this park site.

First, when I made my original trip here the signs indicated that it was a state park that had fallen victim to state budget cuts. This year however the park seemed to have somehow been incorporated into the national park system and I had the opportunity to speak with a national park ranger. The ranger told me that members of the National Park Service staff from neighboring Fort Stanwix rotate service over at the Oriskany Battlefield Park on a daily basis.

Second, it appeared that the National Park Service had made some improvements to the park, including changing the course of the steep walking trail through the ravine at the ambush site, removing some old and faded markers, and added some new and different markers.

From talking with the park ranger it would appear that this marker was one of the old and faded historical markers that was removed and that there is no intention of replacing this specific historical marker.
    — Submitted April 14, 2012, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.

 
Categories. War, US Revolutionary
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bryan Olson of Syracuse, New York. This page has been viewed 887 times since then and 82 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Bryan Olson of Syracuse, New York.   2. submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.   3. submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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