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Near Gettysburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Second Brigade

Second Division - Second Corps

 

—Army of the Potomac —

 
Second Brigade, Second Division, Second Corps Tablet Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, December 27, 2008
1. Second Brigade, Second Division, Second Corps Tablet
The trefoil of the Second Corps appears at the top of the tablet.
Inscription.
Army of the Potomac
Second Corps Second Division
Second Brigade

Brig. Gen. Alexander S. Webb
69th. 71st. 72d. 106th. Penna. Infantry.

July 2 The 69th Penna. took position along the advanced line of the stone wall at the left of the Angle. The other regiments of the Brigade in the rear of the ridge. During the day two companies of the 71st and two of the 106th Penna. were sharply engaged on the skirmish line. About sunset Brig. Gen. Wright's Brigade charged across the Emmitsburg Road to the Union line past the guns of Battery B 1st Rhode Island but was soon repulsed with the loss of many prisoners and forced back beyond the Emmitsburg Road. All the guns temporarily lost were retaken. At night the 71st and 106th Penna. except two companies on skirmish line were sent to the support of the Eleventh Corps on East Cemetery Hill. The former returned at midnight the later remained.

July 3 At 3 p.m. after heavy cannonading for two hours Major Gen. Pickett's Division of about 5,000 men charged the line held by this and the Third Brigade breaking through the line at the Angle. Reinforcements coming up quickly the charge was repulsed with great loss nearly 1,000 prisoners and six battle flags were reported captured by the Brigade.

Casualties. Killed 9 officers 105 men. Wounded 27 officers 311 men.
Webb's Brigade Tablet Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, December 27, 2008
2. Webb's Brigade Tablet
The tablet stands next to monuments to General Webb and the 1st Pennsylvania Cavalry.
Captured or missing 5 officers 34 men. Total 491.
 
Erected 1912 by Gettysburg National Military Park Commission.
 
Location. 39° 48.782′ N, 77° 14.122′ W. Marker is near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in Adams County. Marker is on Hancock Avenue, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Located near the "Angle" on Cemetery Ridge in Gettysburg National Military Park. Marker is in this post office area: Gettysburg PA 17325, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Major General Alexander Webb (a few steps from this marker); First Pennsylvania Cavalry (a few steps from this marker); Artillery Brigade (a few steps from this marker); Cushing's Union Battery (a few steps from this marker); Army of the Potomac (within shouting distance of this marker); The High Water Mark (within shouting distance of this marker); Pickett's Charge (within shouting distance of this marker); Battlefield Landmarks - South and West (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Gettysburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. High Water Mark. National Park Service virtual tour stop. (Submitted on February 14, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Reports of Brig. Gen. Alexander S. Webb.
Repulse of Wright's Brigade on July 2 Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, December 27, 2008
3. Repulse of Wright's Brigade on July 2
Looking from Hancock Avenue near the Copse of Trees to the west on a misty day. In the center is a monument to the 7th Michigan (from Third Brigade of the 2nd Division). In the distance to the left is the Nicholas Codori Farm. The Battery B, 1st Rhode Island held a position on the rise just beyond the 7th Michigan Monument on July 2. The 106th Pennsylvania skirmish line was posted along and beyond the Emmitsburg Road which runs from left to right behind the farm buildings. Wright's Confederates were repulsed before reaching the rock wall running behind the 7th Michigan Monument.
Concerning the actions on the 2nd of July, Webb wrote:
The enemy made the assault of the 2d at about 6.30 p.m. Their line of battle advanced beyond one gun of Brown's battery, receiving at that point the fire of the Sixty-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers and that of the Seventy-first Pennsylvania Volunteers, advanced to the support of the Sixty-ninth; also that of the One hundred and sixth and Seventy-second Pennsylvania Volunteers, which had previously been moved to the left, by command of Major-General Hancock. Colonel Baxter, Seventy-second Pennsylvania Volunteers, at this time was wounded. They halted, wavered, and fell back, pursued by the One hundred and Sixth, Seventy-second, and part of the Seventy-first Pennsylvania Volunteers. The One hundred and sixth and Seventy-second Pennsylvania Volunteers followed them to the Emmitsburg road, capturing and sending to the rear about 250 prisoners, among whom were I colonel, 5 captains, and 15 lieutenants. The Seventy-first Pennsylvania Volunteers captured about 20 prisoners at the position previously held by the Rhode Island battery.

And of the repulse of the Confederates' final assault on July 3, Webb wrote:
The Seventy-first Pennsylvania Volunteers were advanced to the wall on the right of the Sixty-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers. Three of Cushing's guns were run down to the fence, carrying with them their
Webb's Brigade in the Repulse of Pickett's Division Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, December 27, 2008
4. Webb's Brigade in the Repulse of Pickett's Division
Looking from near the 71st Pennsylvania Monument to the south down the stone wall in front of the Copse of Trees (on the left). The 72nd Pennsylvania Monument features a soldier clubbing with a musket. Beyond it is the 69th Pennsylvania Monument.
canister. The Seventy-second Pennsylvania Volunteers were held in reserve under the crest of the hill. The enemy advanced steadily to the fence, driving out a portion of the Seventy-first Pennsylvania Volunteers. General Armistead passed over the fence with probably over 100 of his command and with several battle-flags. The Seventy-second Pennsylvania Volunteers were ordered up to hold the crest, and advanced to within 40 paces of the enemy's line. Colonel Smith, commanding the Seventy-first Pennsylvania Volunteers, threw two companies of his command behind the stone wall on the right of Cushing's battery, 50 paces retired from the point of attack. This disposition of his troops was most important. Colonel Smith showed true military intelligence on the field. The Sixty-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers and most of the Seventy-first Pennsylvania Volunteers, even after the enemy were in their rear, held their position. The Seventy-second Pennsylvania Volunteers fought steadily and persistently, but the enemy would probably have succeeded in piercing our lines had not Colonel Hall advanced with several of his regiments to my support. Defeated, routed, the enemy fled in disorder. General Armistead was left, mortally wounded, within my lines, and 42 of the enemy who crossed the fence lay dead.
(Submitted on February 14, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 695 times since then and 41 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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