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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Pine Harbor in McIntosh County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Captain William McIntosh

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Captain William McIntosh Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, February 12, 2009
1. Captain William McIntosh Marker
Inscription. In this plot under the “Great Oak at Mallow Plantation,” Captain William McIntosh, father of the Indian chief, General William McIntosh, was buried in 1794. Captain McIntosh, an officer in the British army, when stationed in the Creek country, married two Indian women and their sons, William and Roderick, became chiefs among the Creeks. Gen. William McIntosh was killed by his own people on May 1, 1825, for signing the Treaty of Indian Springs. Later his sons and his half-brother Roderick (Roley) led the great Creek trek to Old Indian Territory. They and their descendants have been distinguished lawyers, ministers, statesmen, artists, soldiers – noted leaders in the building of the West.
 
Erected 1955 by Georgia Historical Commission. (Marker Number 095-3.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Georgia Historical Society/Commission marker series.
 
Location. 31° 32.759′ N, 81° 22.576′ W. Marker is in Pine Harbor, Georgia, in McIntosh County. Marker is on Fairhope Road (Cooke Avenue), on the right when traveling south. Click for map. 2.8 miles E of US 17, 2.2 mi N of Eulonia. Some street signs call this Fairhope Rd, Foir Hoppe Road and Cooke Avenue. Marker is in this post office area: Crescent GA 31304, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Captain William McIntosh Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, February 12, 2009
2. Captain William McIntosh Marker
At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Colonel John McIntosh (here, next to this marker); Mallow Plantation (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Old Belleville or Troup Cemetery (approx. 1.1 miles away); Baisden's Bluff Academy (approx. 2.6 miles away); John Houstoun McIntosh (approx. 2.7 miles away); Rice Hope (approx. 2.7 miles away); Old Court House at Sapelo Bridge (approx. 3 miles away); Sutherland's Bluff (approx. 3.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Pine Harbor.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. see McIntosh Family marker
 
Also see . . .  Ezell Family Tree-(Captain) William McIntosh. Capt. McIntosh abandoned his Indian wives and married his cousin, Barbara McIntosh, of Fair Hope Plantation. Fair Hope was just south of Mallow Plantation, Pine Harbor, Georgia, where Capt. Roderick McIntosh, a brother of John McIntosh, and his spinster sister, Miss Winnewood McIntosh, lived. (Submitted on February 16, 2009, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Native AmericansNotable PersonsNotable PlacesWars, US Indian
 
Captain William McIntosh Marker with cemetery in background Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, 2009
3. Captain William McIntosh Marker with cemetery in background
Captain William McIntosh Marker under the Oak Tree as mentioned Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, 2009
4. Captain William McIntosh Marker under the Oak Tree as mentioned
Also shares location with Colonel McIntosh Historical Marker at left
Captain William McIntosh gravesite as mentioned Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, February 12, 2009
5. Captain William McIntosh gravesite as mentioned
Tomb in the Cemetery Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, 2009
6. Tomb in the Cemetery
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 2,794 times since then and 184 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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