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Moore Haven in Glades County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

“Lone Cypress” and Everglades Drainage

 
 
"Lone Cypress" and Everglades Drainage Marker Photo, Click for full size
By B. Jackson, February 23, 2009
1. "Lone Cypress" and Everglades Drainage Marker
Inscription. Shortly after Florida became a state in 1845. Its leaders began to consider draining the swampy areas of south Florida to create prime farmland as an inducement to settlement. In 1850 Florida received title to all swamp and overflowed lands within its borders, but the young state did not have funds to undertake drainage. Finally in 1881 the state convinced a wealthy northerner, Hamilton Disston, to drain the everglades in return for half the acreage he could reclaim. One of his projects was to improve the Caloosahatchee River and connect it to Lake Okeechobee by a canal which enters the lake near here. A lone cypress tree standing at the entrance of this canal served as a navigational aid for boatmen using the new waterways. Early in the 20th century the town of Moore Haven, named for its founder James A. Moore, grew up around the "Lone Cypress" and canal entrance. By this time the state itself had assumed responsibility for drainage, and in 1917-18 it constructed a lock at the canal entrance. In recent years state and federal government have cooperated on the related problems of drainage, flood control, and navigation. As a result, the Caloosahatchee Canal and River have been continually maintained and improved.
 
Erected 1976 by Calusa Valley Historical Society in Cooperation with Department
"Lone Cypress" and Everglades Drainage Marker Photo, Click for full size
By B. Jackson, February 22, 2009
2. "Lone Cypress" and Everglades Drainage Marker
The photograph shows the Lone Cypress as it appears in late winter alongside the historical marker describing its significance. In the background rises the Hwy 27 bridge which crosses over the Caloosahatchee Canal into the town of Moore Haven.
of State. (Marker Number F-257.)
 
Location. 26° 49.952′ N, 81° 5.377′ W. Marker is in Moore Haven, Florida, in Glades County. Marker is at the intersection of Riverside Drive SW and Avenue J SW, on the right when traveling north on Riverside Drive SW. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Moore Haven FL 33471, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 1 other marker is within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Billie Bowlegs III (approx. 6 miles away).
 
Also see . . .
1. 1928 Okeechobee Hurricane. (Submitted on February 24, 2009, by B. Jackson of Maitland, Florida.)
2. Main Street Moore Haven. (Submitted on February 24, 2009, by B. Jackson of Maitland, Florida.)
 
Additional comments.
1. Moore Haven Past
The town of Moore Haven is the government seat of Glades County. It is located on the banks of the Caloosahatchee River, where it was founded in 1915. It was a thriving community until the deadly "Miami Hurricane" of 1926 killed 150-200 town residents and destroyed most of the downtown buildings. Once again tragedy struck during 1928 when the entire Okeechobee region was flooded by another hurricane killing an estimated 2500. Along with structural damage to towns and agricultural
"Lone Cypress" and Everglades Drainage Marker Photo, Click for full size
By B. Jackson, February 22, 2009
3. "Lone Cypress" and Everglades Drainage Marker
land, the hurricane was very devastating to the residents' morale. Because of the aftermath of the 1928 "Okeechobee Hurricane", the Florida State Legislature and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers began planning a massive flood control system to prevent Lake Okeechobee from ever spilling its banks again. The outcome was the Herbert Hoover Dike which encircles the lake. Under the leadership of Mayor, Marian Horwitz O'Brien (one of the first female mayor's in the country), the town of Moore Haven was rebuilt. Today Moore Haven is situated within a region of vast cattle prairies and sugar cane fields that help to serve as a reminder of Florida's agricultural past and a history of the pioneer times of south Florida.
    — Submitted February 24, 2009, by B. Jackson of Maitland, Florida.

 
Categories. 20th CenturyIndustry & CommerceLandmarksNatural ResourcesWaterways & Vessels
 
Downtown Moore Haven Photo, Click for full size
By B. Jackson, February 23, 2009
4. Downtown Moore Haven
Old downtown Moore Haven at the intersection of 1st Street and Avenue J SW.
Glades County Court House Photo, Click for full size
By B. Jackson, February 22, 2009
5. Glades County Court House
Glades County was formed from DeSoto County in 1921 and was originally intended to be named "Muck County" due to the abundance of the rich, dark soil used throughout the county for producing sugarcane, citrus, and cattle forage. The courthouse was constructed in 1928 from a design by E. C. Hosford.
Highway 27 Bridge Photo, Click for full size
By B. Jackson, February 23, 2009
6. Highway 27 Bridge
Highway 27 Bridge crossing over the Caloosahatchee River and the "Lone Cypress" into the town of Moore Haven.
Chalo Nitka Festival Photo, Click for full size
By B. Jackson, February 22, 2009
7. Chalo Nitka Festival
The Chalo Nitka ( Seminole for "Big Bass") Festival has been held in the town of Moore Haven since 1949. The festival reflects the area's Native American Heritage and the culture of rural south Florida.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by B. Jackson of Maitland, Florida. This page has been viewed 2,015 times since then and 125 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by B. Jackson of Maitland, Florida.   2. submitted on , by B. Jackson of Maitland, Florida.   3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on , by B. Jackson of Maitland, Florida. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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