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Near Gettysburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Cavalry Corps

Army of the Potomac

 
 
Cavalry Corps Tablet image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, December 27, 2008
1. Cavalry Corps Tablet
Inscription.
Army of the Potomac
Cavalry Corps
Major General Alfred Pleasanton
First Division Brigadier General John Buford
Second Division Brigadier General David McM. Gregg
Third Division Brigadier General John Judson Kilpatrick
Headquarters Guard Co. C. 1st. Ohio Capt. Samuel N. Stanford
Horse Artillery First Brigade Capt. James M. Robertson
Second Brigade Capt. John C. Tidball

June 29. Buford's Division advanced and extended its lines to left as far as Hagerstown to discover Confederate forces if any on left of the Army. Gregg's Division moved to right of the Army to Westminster covering the country toward York and Carlisle by reconnoissances and patrols. Kilpatrick's Division advanced to Hanover.

June 30. Gamble's and Devin's Brigades Buford's Division advanced to Gettysburg. Kilpatrick's Division encountered Stuart's Cavalry at Hanover. Huey's Third Brigade was left at Westminster.

July 1. Gamble's and Devin's Brigades encountered Heth's Division Hill's Corps on second ridge west of Gettysburg when 1st. and 11th. Corps retreated to Cemetery Hill the Cavalry took position first on the left connecting with the town and later further to the left in front of Little Round Top.

July 2. On the arrival of 3d. Corps Buford's command was ordered to Westminster. Kilpatrick's Division marched
Cavalry Corps Tablet with the Pennsylvania Monument image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, December 27, 2008
2. Cavalry Corps Tablet with the Pennsylvania Monument
toward Gettysburg and was ordered to the right and was attacked at Hunterstown by a detachment of Stuart's Command which was repulsed.

July 3. Merritt's Brigade arrived and skirmished with the Confederate right while the 6th. U.S. advanced to Fairfield and became engaged. Kilpatrick with Farnsworth's Brigade took position on left of battle line and made a charge in the afternoon on the Confederate right but was repulsed with loss including General Farnsworth killed. Gregg's Division on the right was attacked by Stuart's Cavalry in the afternoon but with the aid of Custer's Brigade Kilpatrick's Division the attack was repulsed.

Casualties: Killed 5 officers, 86 men; Wounded 39 officers 315 men; Total 852.
 
Erected 1908 by Gettysburg National Military Park Commission.
 
Location. 39° 48.488′ N, 77° 14.095′ W. Marker is near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in Adams County. Marker is on Pleasonton Avenue, on the right when traveling east. Click for map. Located north of the Pennsylvania State Memorial in Gettysburg National Military Park. Marker is in this post office area: Gettysburg PA 17325, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 2d Corps Headquarters (a few steps from this marker); Second Brigade
Statue of General Pleasonton on Pennsylvania Monument image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, December 27, 2008
3. Statue of General Pleasonton on Pennsylvania Monument
(within shouting distance of this marker); 8th Pennsylvania Cavalry (within shouting distance of this marker); 84th Pennsylvania Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); 4th New York Cavalry (within shouting distance of this marker); Pennsylvania State Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); 124th New York Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); Pennsylvania Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Gettysburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. High Water Mark. National Park Service virtual tour stop. (Submitted on February 27, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Report of Maj. Gen. Alfred Pleasonton. In his official report, Pleasonton stopped to laud the officers and men in his command for their conduct during the campaign:
In reviewing the conduct of the cavalry corps in this campaign, it becomes a proud gratification to call the attention of the major-general commanding to the devoted spirit and resolution that animated the officers and men throughout all the difficulties, privations, trials, and dangers they had constantly to meet, and which they overcame so gloriously. Not a single mishap occurred to mar the recollection of their noble and brilliant deeds. (Submitted on February 27, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 918 times since then and 107 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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