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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
New York in New York County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

97 Orchard Street

 
 
97 Orchard Street Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Beverly Pfingsten, February 9, 2009
1. 97 Orchard Street Marker
Inscription. Built in 1863-64 by Lucas Glockner, a German-born tailor, 97 Orchard Street is typical of the earliest form of tenement house constructed in New York. For millions of immigrants from scores of nations, this tenement and others like it was a place of first settlement in America. We salute them as our urban pioneers on the municipal frontier.

This is the first tenement to be individually listed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior.
September, 1992
 
Location. 40° 43.112′ N, 73° 59.406′ W. Marker is in New York, New York, in New York County. Marker is on Orchard Street, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is between Bloome Street and Delancy Street. Marker is in this post office area: New York NY 10002, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Kehila Kedosha Janina (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Bowery Savings Bank (approx. mile away); Black Horse Inn (approx. 0.4 miles away); Our Lady of Sorrow World War II Memorial (approx. 0.4 miles away); The Puck Building (approx. half a mile away); New York Marble Cemetery
97 Orchard Street Photo, Click for full size
By Beverly Pfingsten, February 9, 2009
2. 97 Orchard Street
Lower East Side Tenement Museum.
Museum is the 5 story apartment building behind the red sign.
(approx. half a mile away); Americans of Chinese Ancestry (approx. half a mile away); Lin Ze Xu (approx. 0.6 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in New York.
 
Regarding 97 Orchard Street. 97 Orchard St. was one of many tenements built to house new immigrants to New York City. This building built in 1863 was home to over 7,000 people between 1863 and 1935 when it was condemned as a residence. The owners could not afford to replace the wooden stair railings to meet building code. Commercial tenants remained on the first floor and basement, but the upper floors containing 20 apartments were abandoned. Parts of the building have been restored to demonstrate the living conditions during various phases of occupancy by German, Italian, Irish and other ethnic groups over its many years.
 
Also see . . .  Lower East Side Tenement Museum - Virtual tour. (Submitted on February 28, 2009, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.)
 
Categories. Notable BuildingsSettlements & Settlers
 
Lower East Side Tenements Photo, Click for full size
By Beverly Pfingsten, February 9, 2009
3. Lower East Side Tenements
Another view of the many tenements that were occupied by immigrants.
Lower East Side Tenement Museum Photo, Click for full size
By Beverly Pfingsten, February 9, 2009
4. Lower East Side Tenement Museum
Another view.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland. This page has been viewed 824 times since then and 41 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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