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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Hilton Head Island in Beaufort County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Steam Gun

 
 
Steam Gun Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, February 6, 2009
1. Steam Gun Marker
Inscription. Hilton Head Steamgun was the last of 13 produced - 8 land based and 5 ship borne. The 50 foot long, 15-inch diameter barrel propelled a 7 foot long, dynamite loaded projectile up to 3 .25 miles. Two steam engines powered an electric generator and two air compressors to feed air at 2,000 PSI through the dune to two sides of the gun. The Hilton Head gun was fired more than 100 times in late 1901 and early 1902. It was dissembled in 1902.
 
Location. 32° 14.13′ N, 80° 40.656′ W. Marker is in Hilton Head Island, South Carolina, in Beaufort County. Marker can be reached from Fort Walker Drive. Click for map. Located near Circle at Catesby Lane, small park beachside, featuring the Steamgun ruins, at Port Royal Plantation -Secure Gated Community- Restricted entrance. Marker is in this post office area: Hilton Head Island SC 29928, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Two Gallant Gentlemen from South Carolina (within shouting distance of this marker); Battle of Port Royal (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Hilton Head (about 300 feet away); Fort Walker (approx. 0.2 miles away); "Robbers Row"
Steam Gun Marker at left, among remains of a support building Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, February 6, 2009
2. Steam Gun Marker at left, among remains of a support building
(approx. 0.2 miles away); St. James Baptist Church (approx. 0.8 miles away); Mitchelville Site (approx. 0.8 miles away); Fort Howell - 1864 (approx. 0.9 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Hilton Head Island.
 
Regarding Steam Gun. Steam Gun - Located at the end of Fort Walker Drive are the remnants of a large cannon that was operated by pressurized air. It was built at the beginning of the century to defend against a possible coastal attack. In a park-like setting, parts of the turret cannon, steam piping and boiler rooms are visible.
 
Also see . . .  The Zalinski Dynamite Gun. a test battery , two 15-inch guns and the 8-inch prototype at Fort Hancock , New Jersey in 1894. Second battery of three 15-inch guns, at San Francisco to guard the Golden Gate in 1898. In 1901, two-one gun batteries at Hilton Head, South Carolina and Fishers Island, New York . All four batteries were sold for scrap, in 1904, and the builders went out of business. (Submitted on March 3, 2009, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. 20th CenturyMilitary
 
Steam Gun ruins Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, 2009
3. Steam Gun ruins
Steam Gun ruins, perhaps where the steam generators were located Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, 2009
4. Steam Gun ruins, perhaps where the steam generators were located
Steam Gun , perhaps were air compressors were housed Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, February 6, 2009
5. Steam Gun , perhaps were air compressors were housed
Steam Gun ruins, turret area Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, February 6, 2009
6. Steam Gun ruins, turret area
the ruins of Battery Dynamite, a battery constructed to hold one of Edmund Zalinski's dynamite guns, from around 1901.
Steam Gun ruins Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, 2009
7. Steam Gun ruins
Steam Gun , Port Royal Sound in background Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, February 6, 2009
8. Steam Gun , Port Royal Sound in background
Steam Gun ruins Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, February 2009
9. Steam Gun ruins
the center of the gun station and the ribbed notches for the rotating turret.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 3,841 times since then and 302 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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