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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Luray in Page County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Calendine

 
 
Calendine Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Robert H. Moore, II, circa 2002
1. Calendine Marker
Inscription. Calendine was built in the early 1850s by Townsend Young. The adjacent one story building served as a general store and stage stop on the Sperryville-New Market turnpike. The store was also a social gathering place for exchange of news and gossip. Calendine was one the home of sculptor Herbert Barbee (1848-1936) who used the store as a studio.

Mr. Barbee may be best known for creating the Confederate Monument located on East main St., Luray.

Purchased by Page County Heritage Association in 1968. Calendine preserves the past to enrich our future.
 
Erected by Page County Heritage Association.
 
Location. 38° 39.475′ N, 78° 30.752′ W. Marker is near Luray, Virginia, in Page County. Marker is on Hamburg Road (County Route 766), on the left when traveling west. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Luray VA 22835, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Mauck Meeting House (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Reverend John Roads (Rhodes) (approx. 1.2 miles away); White House Bridge (approx. 1.2 miles away); White House
Old store/stagecoach stop next to Calendine Photo, Click for full size
By Robert H. Moore, II, circa 2002
2. Old store/stagecoach stop next to Calendine
(approx. 1.2 miles away); Fort Philip Long (approx. 1.7 miles away); Massanutton (approx. 1.8 miles away); Willow Grove Mill (approx. 2.7 miles away); White House Ferry (approx. 2.7 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Luray.
 
Also see . . .  Avenue of Armies: Civil War Sites and Stories of Luray and Page County, Virginia. (Submitted on March 20, 2009, by Robert H. Moore, II of Winchester, Virginia.)
 
Additional comments.
1. Calendine in the Civil War
Built ca. 1840 by William Townsend Young, Calendine was his residence at the time of the war. By the spring of 1861, fifty-seven-year-old Young was a successful merchant in this neighborhood at Hamburg, just west of Luray. Young also ran the nearby general store and coach stop for the Burke Stage Line. At the time, the New Market to Sperryville Turnpike ran immediately in front of the buildings.

According to an early twentieth-century account by the famous sculptor Herbert Barbee, “One morning,” following the secession of Virginia, “while people waited and listened for the rumbling of the
Calendine Photo, Click for full size
By Robert H. Moore, II, 2002
3. Calendine
massive wheels of the four horse stage, a little black boy walked in and took a seat on a nearby dry goods box and began thumping its sides with his rough rugged barefoot heels and modestly said, ‘Marse Townsend, the white folks in Luray wants you to come dar, fer big trouble is going down de Valley.’ Mr. Young, a quiet, earnest man, listened but said nothing, but in due time rode to Luray and there called for volunteers to repel invasion.”

Young was subsequently elected captain of the Page Volunteers, later Company K, 10th Virginia Infantry.

A number of years after the war, Calendine was owned by Herbert Barbee. Like his father, William Randolph Barbee, Herbert sculpted many pieces of art throughout his career. A fine example of his work can be seen in the Confederate Monument (also known as the Confederate heroes Monument) on Main Street in Luray.

From pp. 28-29, Avenue of Armies: Civil War Sites and Stories of Luray and Page County, Virginia, by Robert H. Moore, II
    — Submitted March 4, 2009, by Robert H. Moore, II of Winchester, Virginia.

 
Categories. Antebellum South, USArts, Letters, Music
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Robert H. Moore, II of Winchester, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,287 times since then and 98 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Robert H. Moore, II of Winchester, Virginia. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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