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Near McDowell in Highland County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Battle of McDowell

May 8, 1862

 
 
The Battle of McDowell Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Robert H. Moore, II, February 27, 2009
1. The Battle of McDowell Marker
Inscription. In the spring of 1862 Confederate fortunes seemed to have gone from bad to worse. Union forces had won several key battles in the West, while the U.S. Navy was establishing its coastal blockade and Major General George B. McClellan’s Army of the Potomac threatened Richmond. General Robert E. Lee, military advisor to President Jefferson Davis, ordered a diversion to prevent additional Union reinforcements from being sent against the Confederate capital. Lee ordered Major General Thomas J/. “Stonewall” Jackson to make an attack in the Shenandoah Valley.

As his diversionary strike, Jackson decided to attack the Federal forces converging on Staunton. Through the rain, Jackson pushed his Confederates westward on a forced march towards Staunton. On May 7, the Southerners discovered Union pickets about thirty miles from Staunton near McDowell. The Federal commander, Brigadier General Robert H. Milroy, withdrew his forces across the Bull Pasture River and requested reinforcements from his superior, Brigadier General Robert Schenk. On May 8, the Federals deployed in a defensive position across Sitlington’s Hill. However, with only 6,000 men to Jackson’s 10,000, Schenk decided to withdraw. In the early afternoon, to delay the Confederates while his main force retreated, Schenk launched an attack.

The Confederate victory
Civil War Preservation Trust image, Click for more information
2. Civil War Preservation Trust
at McDowell was the first clash in the 1862 Valley Campaign that tied down 60,000 Federals and firmly established Jackson’s military reputation.
 
Erected by Civil War Preservation Trust and Shenandoah Valley Battlefields Foundation.
 
Location. 38° 19.718′ N, 79° 28.542′ W. Marker is near McDowell, Virginia, in Highland County. Marker can be reached from U.S. 250, on the right when traveling east. Click for map. Located in the Civil War Preservation's Trust McDowell Battlefield. Marker is in this post office area: Mc Dowell VA 24458, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Commemorating The Battle Of McDowell (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Battle of McDowell (about 700 feet away); a different marker also named The Battle of McDowell (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named The Battle of McDowell (approx. 0.3 miles away); a different marker also named The Battle of McDowell (approx. 0.4 miles away); a different marker also named The Battle of McDowell (approx. 0.6 miles away); a different marker
The Battle of McDowell Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Robert H. Moore, II, February 27, 2009
3. The Battle of McDowell Marker
also named Battle of McDowell (approx. 0.6 miles away); a different marker also named Battle of McDowell (approx. 0.7 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in McDowell.
 
More about this marker. On the left is a map captioned, In an attempt to buy time, the Federal infantry repeatedly stormed the hill and failed to dislodge the Confederates. After nightfall, the Federals retreated west beyond McDowell.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Categories. Notable EventsNotable PersonsWar, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Robert H. Moore, II of Winchester, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,174 times since then and 97 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Robert H. Moore, II of Winchester, Virginia.   2. submitted on .   3. submitted on , by Robert H. Moore, II of Winchester, Virginia. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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