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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Rock Hill in York County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Black Plantation / Hampton Campaign

 
 
Black Plantation / Hampton Campaign Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, October 12, 2008
1. Black Plantation / Hampton Campaign Marker
Inscription.
Black Plantation
This area was once part of the 448.5-acre plantation of Alexander Templeton Black (1798-1875), for whom Church Street was renamed Black Street. In 1851 Black deeded land for a right-of-way and depot to the Charlotte & S.C. Railroad. He also created and sold 23 town lots along a new Main Street, fulfilling his dream to establish a town here. The post office that opened nearby "Rock Hill" after the hill the railroad tracks cut through.

Hampton Campaign
The 1876 S.C. gubernatorial election was bitterly contested by Republican Gov. Daniel H. Chamberlain (1835-1907) and Democrat and ex-Confederate general Wade Hampton (1818-1902). On Oct. 12, 1876, citizens welcomed Hampton to Rock Hill near this site; this street was later renamed for him. Mounted Democratic cluds led him to Chatham Ave., where spoke to a crowd of 3,000. The vote in York County and the upcounty was critical to Hampton's eventual victory.
 
Erected 2008 by The Culture and Heritage Museums of York County and the City of Rock Hill. (Marker Number 46-43.)
 
Location. 34° 55.47′ N, 81° 1.628′ W. Marker is in Rock Hill, South Carolina, in York County. Marker is at the
Reverse Side Photo, Click for full size
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, October 12, 2008
2. Reverse Side
intersection of East Black Street (State Highway 5) and Hampton Street on East Black Street. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Rock Hill SC 29730, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Andrew Jackson Hotel / Vernon Grant (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Village of Rock Hill / City of Rock Hill (about 300 feet away); McCrory's Civil Rights Sit-ins / "Friendship Nine" (about 400 feet away); U.S. Post Office and Courthouse / Citizen's Building (about 400 feet away); First Presbyterian Church / Church Leaders (about 700 feet away); Episcopal Church of Our Saviour (approx. 0.2 miles away); Rock Hill (approx. 0.2 miles away); Rock Hill Depots / Rock Hill Street Railway (approx. 0.2 miles away); First Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church / Dr. Arthur Small Rogers (approx. 0.2 miles away); Rock Hill Cotton Factory (approx. ¼ mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Rock Hill.
 
Also see . . .
1. Alexander Templeton Black. Alexander Templeton Black was the fourth generation of his family to live in America and the third generation to own land in the York District of South Carolina. (Submitted on April 5, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta Railroad. In 1869 the Charlotte and South Carolina Railroad
BLACK PLANTATION Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, October 12, 2008
3. BLACK PLANTATION Marker
and the Columbia and Augusta Railroad merged to form the Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta Railroad. (Submitted on January 16, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. Daniel H. Chamberlain. Daniel Henry Chamberlain (June 23, 1835 – April 13, 1907) was a planter, lawyer, author and the Republican Governor of South Carolina from 1874 until 1877. (Submitted on April 5, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. South Carolina Governor Daniel Henry Chamberlain. Daniel Henry Chamberlain was born in West Brookfield, Massachusetts. (Submitted on April 5, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

5. Wade Hampton III. Wade Hampton III (March 28, 1818 – April 11, 1902) was a Confederate cavalry leader during the American Civil War and afterwards a politician from South Carolina, serving as its governor and as a U.S. Senator. (Submitted on April 5, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Historical Marker Honors Black and Hampton
On Thursday, May 15th, the City of Rock Hill, along with the Culture and Heritage Museums, held a ceremony downtown to dedicate the Black Plantation / Hampton Rally Historical Marker, in honor of Alexander Templeton Black and Wade Hampton.

Black, one of Rock Hill’s founders, formerly owned a 448 ½ acre cotton plantation spanning the area now known as downtown. Wanting
Alexander T Black Photo, Click for full size
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, 2009
4. Alexander T Black
King’ s Mountain fifer and nephew of James Wilson, signer of the Declaration of Independence.
to establish a town here, Black created and sold 23 lots along a new Main Street; and he allowed the railroad to use some of his land. He was a business-savvy man who helped build Rock Hill into the city we know today. In his honor, Church Street was eventually renamed Black Street.

Hampton, a former Civil War general, ran for governor in 1876. After a rally was held in Rock Hill, political support turned in his favor. The vote in York County and the Upstate was critical to his victory in the election. Hampton Street was named in his honor.

The Black Plantation / Hampton Rally Historical Marker is located downtown, on the corner of Black Street and Hampton Street. (Source: Old Town News (Rock Hill), June 2008.)
    — Submitted January 16, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

 
Categories. GovernmentPoliticsSettlements & Settlers
 
Gov. Daniel H. Chamberlain<br>(1835–1907) Photo, Click for full size
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, 2009
5. Gov. Daniel H. Chamberlain
(1835–1907)
He was a planter, lawyer, author, and the Republican Governor of South Carolina from 1874 until 1877.
S.C. Attorney General 1868-1872
Gen. Wade Hampton Photo, Click for full size
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, 2009
6. Gen. Wade Hampton
Born into a distinguished South Carolina family and descended from Revolutionary War patriots, Hampton organized a cavalry force, Hampton's Legion, and outfitted them at his own expense. He rose to brigadier quickly, was wounded at First Manassas, Seven Pines and Gettysburg, and was promoted to major general in August of 1863.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,314 times since then and 84 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina.   4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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