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Gettysburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
The Gettysburg Address
 
The Gettysburg Address Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, December 27, 2008
1. The Gettysburg Address Marker
 
Inscription.
"We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We are met to dedicate a portion of it as the final resting-place of those who have given their lives that that nation might live."
President Abraham Lincoln
Gettysburg Address

On the morning of November 19, 1863, nearly 20,000 statesmen, soldiers and citizens converged on this hill to consecrate the new Soldiers' National Cemetery. The speakers' platform was located in Evergreen Cemetery to your left.

The Hon. Edward Everett, principal speaker and former Governor of Massachusetts, took the platform at noon. His eloquent, but exhausting, speech lasted two hours.

Following a hymn, President Abraham Lincoln rose to deliver "dedicatory remarks." As the crowd strained to see and hear, Lincoln spoke deliberately and without gestures. According to some observers, the people received his prayer-like words in stunned silence. The "Gettysburg Address" lasted two minutes.

Lincoln left the platform believing his remarks had disappointed the people. As time passed, however, it became clear that his simple utterances had found a place in many American hearts - and would for generations to come.
 
Erected by Gettysburg National Military Park.
 
Location. 39° 49.198′ 
 
The Gettysburg Address Marker<br>Main Text Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, September 22, 2015
2. The Gettysburg Address Marker
Main Text
 
N, 77° 13.844′ W. Marker is in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in Adams County. Marker can be reached from Taneytown Road (State Highway 134), on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Located near the Soldiers Memorial in the center of Gettysburg National Cemetery. Marker is in this post office area: Gettysburg PA 17325, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Battery G, Fourth U.S. Artillery (here, next to this marker); Mary Virginia Wade (a few steps from this marker); Kentucky Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Soldier’s National Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); Battery H, 1st U.S. Artillery (within shouting distance of this marker); New York State Memorial (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Bvt. Maj. Gen. Charles H.T. Collis Memorial (about 300 feet away); Fifth New York Light Artillery (about 400 feet away); First Minnesota Volunteers (about 400 feet away); Fifth New York Independent Battery (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Gettysburg.
 
More about this marker. In the upper center This extraordinary photo from the National Archives shows the crowd assembled for the dedication ceremonies here November 19, 1863. The man whose head is circled is believed to be Abraham Lincoln.

In the lower center is a portrait of Lincoln. Alexander Gardner took this photo of President Abraham Lincoln four days before he delivered the Gettysburg Address.

On the lower right is a photo-copy of one of the original copies of the address. The Hay Draft of the Gettysburg Address, penciled in Lincoln's own hand, may be the one Lincoln carried in his coat pocket to the ceremonies here. The document is preserved at the Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.
 
The Gettysburg Address Marker<br>Hay Draft of the Gettysburg Address Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, September 22, 2015
3. The Gettysburg Address Marker
Hay Draft of the Gettysburg Address
Penciled in Lincoln's own hand, may be the one Lincoln carried in his coat packet to the ceremonies here. The document is preserved at the Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.
 

 
Also see . . .
1. The Gettysburg Address. Library of Congress site discussing the history of the address. (Submitted on March 8, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Edward Everett. Edward Everett (April 11, 1794 – January 15, 1865) was an American politician, pastor, educator, diplomat, and orator from Massachusetts. Everett, a Whig, served as U.S. Representative, U.S. Senator, the 15th Governor of Massachusetts, Minister to Great Britain, and United States Secretary of State. He also taught at Harvard University and served as its president. Everett was one of the great American orators of the antebellum and Civil War eras. He is often remembered today as the featured orator at the dedication ceremony of the Gettysburg National Cemetery in 1863, where he spoke for over two hours—immediately before President Abraham Lincoln delivered his famous, two-minute Gettysburg Address. (Submitted on November 24, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
The Gettysburg Address Marker<br>Photo of Lincoln Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, September 22, 2015
4. The Gettysburg Address Marker
Photo of Lincoln
This extraordinary photo from the National Archives shows the crowd assembled for the dedication ceremonies here November 19, 1863. The man whose head is circled is believed to be Abraham Lincoln.
 
 
The Gettysburg Address Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, September 22, 2015
5. The Gettysburg Address Marker
 
 
The Gettysburg Address Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, April 4, 2009
6. The Gettysburg Address Marker
The marker stands in front of the tablet for Battery G, 4th US Artillery.
 
 
The Gettysburg Address Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, September 22, 2015
7. The Gettysburg Address Marker
 
 
Edward Everett (1794-1865)<br>Principle Speaker at the Dedication Ceremony Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott
8. Edward Everett (1794-1865)
Principle Speaker at the Dedication Ceremony
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on March 8, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,288 times since then. Photos:   1. submitted on March 8, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on November 24, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   6. submitted on April 17, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   7, 8. submitted on November 24, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.
 
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