“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Charlestown in Cecil County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)

Lt. Col. Nathaniel Ramsay

Lt. Col. Nathaniel Ramsay Marker image. Click for full size.
By Beverly Pfingsten, July 14, 2007
1. Lt. Col. Nathaniel Ramsay Marker
Inscription. Member of Council of Safety and Courageous Officer of the Maryland Line in Revolutionary War, native of Pennsylvania, Princeton Graduate (1767) and lawyer. He settled in brick house near this site after his marriage in 1771 to Margaret Jean Peale. In 1775 he and his brother-in-law, famed portrait painter and inventor Charles Wilson Peale, conducted experiments here in manufacturing of gunpowder. Serving under Washington in 1778, Ramsay was wounded at Monmouth, New Jersey, and taken prisoner by the British. After the war he served 2 terms in Congress.
Erected by Maryland Bicentennial Commission & Maryland Historical Society.
Location. 39° 34.401′ N, 75° 58.541′ W. Marker is in Charlestown, Maryland, in Cecil County. Marker is on Market Street 0.1 miles east of Bladen Street, on the left. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Charlestown MD 21914, United States of America.
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Charlestown (within shouting distance of this marker); Susquehanna Manor (approx. 0.2 miles away); Captain Michael Rudulph (approx. 0.2 miles away); Shrewd Decision
Site of Ramsay House image. Click for full size.
By John Miller, February 17, 2012
2. Site of Ramsay House
The Ramsay house burned down in 1834 but was located on the site of the brick Methodist Parsonage seen here (226 Market St.). Prior to purchase by Ramsay the original house belonged to John Ross Key, father of Francis Scott Key. (Town website)
(approx. ¼ mile away); Site of Charlestown Wharf (approx. ¼ mile away); St. Mary Anne’s Church (approx. 2.4 miles away); North East (approx. 2.4 miles away); Striking a Blow (approx. 3.1 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Charlestown.
Also see . . .
1. Biography of Nathaniel Ramsey. Note spelling difference in last name. (Submitted on July 14, 2007, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.) 

2. Charlestown History. Official town website. (Submitted on February 17, 2012, by John Miller of Rising Sun, Maryland.) 
Additional comments.
1. First United States Marshal for the District of Maryland
As a Deputy US Marshal with the District of Maryland I would like you to know that, in addition to the facts given on the marker, Nathaniel Ramsay was also appointed as the first US Marshal for the District of Maryland in 1798 and served until 1794. The US Marshal was the only local representative of the executive branch of the Federal Government during those times and enforced the laws and powers of the federal government. Marshal Ramsey would have had such duties as arresting federal fugitives and taking the first national census. The US Marshals Service is the oldest federal law enforcement agency with the most complete jurisdiction.
    — Submitted July 26, 2007, by David Lutz of Baltimore, Maryland.

2. Councils and Committees of Safety
“Committees of Safety, formed before and during the Revolutionary War, to keep watch of and act upon events pertaining to the public welfare, were really committees of vigilance. They were of incalculable service during that period in detecting conspiracies against the interests of the people and restraining evil disposed persons. They were sometimes possessed of almost supreme executive power, delegated to them by the people. Massachusetts took the lead in the appointment of a committee of safety so early as the autumn of 1774, of which John Hancock was chairman. It was given power to call out the militia, provide means of defense—in a word, provide many of the duties of a provisional government. Other colonies appointed committees of safety. One was appointed in the city of New York, composed of the leading citizens. These committees were in constant communication with the committees of correspondence.” —from the 1905 edition of Harper’s Encyclopædia of United States History.
    — Submitted July 26, 2007, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.

3. The Maryland Line
The Maryland Line was the name used by the Maryland Continental troops in the American Revolution. General Washington regarded them as some of his finest soldiers and referred to them as the “Old Line.” They fought valiantly on many battlefields, especially at Long Island, Camden, The Cowpens and Guilford Courthouse.
    — Submitted July 26, 2007, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.

Additional keywords. Nathaniel Ramsey
Categories. Colonial EraNotable PersonsPatriots & PatriotismWar, US Revolutionary
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland. This page has been viewed 1,784 times since then and 58 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.   2. submitted on , by John Miller of Rising Sun, Maryland. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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