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Gettysburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Continuing a Tradition: Freemasonry at Gettysburg

 
 
Continuing a Tradition: Fremasonry at Gettysburg Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 21, 2009
1. Continuing a Tradition: Fremasonry at Gettysburg Marker
Inscription.
The Right Worshipful Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of Pennsylvania laid and dedicated the cornerstone of the first battlefield monument on July 4, 1865. That Soldier's National Monument is located on the grounds of the Soldiers' National Cemetery, beyond the stone wall, to your left front. At the close of the ceremonies, Pennsylvania Governor Andrew Curtin, a Freemason, thanked the brotherhood for their dedication of this monument to "devotion and fidelity to country."

In 1993, the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania continued this early association with Gettysburg by donating the Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial. The monument depicts an actual incident of the battle, one which also inspired the 1899 design for the banner of the Local Gettysburg Commandery No. 79. Mortally wounded Confederate General Lewis A. Armistead is shown being aided by Union Captain Henry H. Bingham, during the closing moments of the battle July 3, 1863. These officers were among an estimated 15,000 Freemasons who fought at Gettysburg. The incident testifies to the unyielding bonds of brotherhood among Freemasons during America's divisive Civil War.

Since the original 3,600 Civil War interments, the Gettysburg National Cemetery and Annex have become a burial place for more than 7,000 veterans. Although the five-acre annex to the cemetery
Continuing a Tradition: Fremasonry at Gettysburg Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 18, 2014
2. Continuing a Tradition: Fremasonry at Gettysburg Marker
The Friend to Friend Masonic memorial depicting General Armistead and Captain Bingham can be seen behind the marker.
was opened in 1967, it was not until 1993 that major landscaping improvements could be undertaken as a result of a generous donation from the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania.

"The unique bonds of friendship among Freemasons enabled them to remain a brotherhood undivided, even as they fought in a divided nation, faithfully supporting the respective governments under which they lived"
Edward H. Fowler, Jr., Right Worshipful Grand Master, Masonic Memorial Dedication, August 21, 1993

More information about the Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial is available at the Visitor Center.
 
Erected by Gettysburg National Military Park - National Cemetery Annex.
 
Location. 39° 49.3′ N, 77° 13.955′ W. Marker is in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in Adams County. Marker is at the intersection of Stienwehr Avenue (State Highway 134) and Washington Street, on the right when traveling north on Stienwehr Avenue. Click for map. Located in the Gettysburg National Cemetery Annex. Marker is in this post office area: Gettysburg PA 17325, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 55th Ohio Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); Dobbin House (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial
Continuing a Tradition: Freemasonry at Gettysburg Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 22, 2015
3. Continuing a Tradition: Freemasonry at Gettysburg Marker
(about 300 feet away); a different marker also named The Dobbin House (about 400 feet away); July 1, 1863 (about 400 feet away); 73rd Ohio Infantry (about 500 feet away); 75th Pennslyvania Volunteers (about 600 feet away); “The National Homestead at Gettysburg” (about 600 feet away); New York State Memorial (about 600 feet away); Major General John Reynolds (about 600 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Gettysburg.
 
More about this marker. In the upper part of the marker is a sketch depicting the dedication of the Soldiers' National Memorial dedication. In the lower center is an illustration depicting the exchange between General Armistead and Captain Bingham, next to the Gettysburg Commandery banner.
 
Also see . . .
1. Andrew Gregg Curtin. Andrew Gregg Curtin (April 22, 1817 – October 7, 1894) was a U.S. lawyer and politician. He served as the Governor of Pennsylvania during the Civil War. (Submitted on November 24, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.)
Continuing a Tradition: Freemasonry at Gettysburg Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 22, 2015
4. Continuing a Tradition: Freemasonry at Gettysburg Marker
 

2. Lewis Armistead. Lewis Addison Armistead (February 18, 1817 – July 5, 1863) was a United States Army officer who became a brigadier general in the Confederate States Army. On July 3, 1863, as part of Pickett's Charge during the Battle of Gettysburg, Armistead led his brigade to the farthest point reached by Confederate forces during the charge, a point now referred to as the high-water mark of the Confederacy. However, he and his men were overwhelmed, and he was wounded and captured by Union troops; he died in a field hospital two days later. (Submitted on November 24, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. Henry H. Bingham. Henry Harrison Bingham (December 4, 1841 – March 22, 1912) was a Union Army officer in the American Civil War, who received the United States Military's highest award for valor, the Medal of Honor, for his actions at the Battle of the Wilderness. (Submitted on November 24, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesCharity & Public WorkFraternal or Sororal OrganizationsWar, US Civil
 
Continuing a Tradition: Freemasonry at Gettysburg Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 22, 2015
5. Continuing a Tradition: Freemasonry at Gettysburg Marker
Continuing a Tradition: Freemasonry at Gettysburg Marker<br>Main Text 1 image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 22, 2015
6. Continuing a Tradition: Freemasonry at Gettysburg Marker
Main Text 1
Continuing a Tradition: Freemasonry at Gettysburg Marker<br>Main Text 2 image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 22, 2015
7. Continuing a Tradition: Freemasonry at Gettysburg Marker
Main Text 2
Extract from 'Repulse of Longstreet's Assault," by James Walker, 1870 image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 22, 2015
8. Extract from 'Repulse of Longstreet's Assault," by James Walker, 1870
Marker and the Cemetery Annex image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 21, 2009
9. Marker and the Cemetery Annex
Continuing a Tradition: Freemasonry at Gettysburg Marker<br>Steinwehr Avenue Entrance image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 22, 2015
10. Continuing a Tradition: Freemasonry at Gettysburg Marker
Steinwehr Avenue Entrance
Andrew Gregg Curtin (1817-1894)<br>Governor of Pennsylvania during the Civil War image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott
11. Andrew Gregg Curtin (1817-1894)
Governor of Pennsylvania during the Civil War
Lewis A. Armistead (1817-1863)<br>Mortally Wounded During the Battle image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott
12. Lewis A. Armistead (1817-1863)
Mortally Wounded During the Battle
Henry H. Bingham (1841-1912) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott
13. Henry H. Bingham (1841-1912)
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 933 times since then and 63 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   9. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   10, 11, 12, 13. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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