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Gettysburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial

 
 
Friend to Friend Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 21, 2009
1. Friend to Friend Memorial
The inscription is repeated on the back.
Inscription.
(Front and Back):
Friend to Friend
A Brotherhood Undivided

(Left):
Friend to Friend
Masonic Memorial

This monument is presented by the Right Worshipful Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of Pennsylvania and dedicated as a memorial to the Freemasons of the Union and Confederacy. Their unique bonds of friendship enabled them to remain a brotherhood undivided, even as they fought in a divided nation, faithfully supporting the respective governments under which they lived.
Dedicated August 21, 1993
By
The right Worshipful Grand Lodge
Of The Most Ancient And Honorable Fraternity
Of Free And Accepted Masons of Pennsylvania
And Masonic Jursidiction Thereunto Belonging.

Edward H. Fowler, Jr., Right Worshipful Grand Master
George H. Hohenshildt, R.W. Deputy Grand Master, Chairman
Edward O. Weisser, R.W. Senior Grand Warden
James L. Ernette, R.W. Junior Grand Warden
Marvin G. Speicher, R.W. Grand Treasurer
Thomas W. Jackson, R.W. Grand Secretary

(Right):
Friend to Friend

Union General Winfield Scott Hancock and Confederate General Lewis Addison Armistead were personal friends and members of the Masonic Fraternity.

Although they had served and fought side by side in the United
Left Side Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 21, 2009
2. Left Side Plaque
States Army prior to the Civil War, Armistead refused to raise his sword against his fellow Southerners and joined the Confederate Army in 1861.

Both Hancock and Armistead fought heroically in the previous twenty-seven months of the war. They were destined to meet at Gettysburg.

During Pickett's Charge, Armistead led his men gallantly, penetrating Hancock's line. Ironically, when Armistead was mortally wounded, Hancock was also wounded.

Depicted in this sculpture is Union Captain Henry Bingham, a Mason and staff assistant to General Hancock, himself wounded, rendering aid to the fallen Confederate General. Armistead is shown handing his watch and personal effects to be taken to his friend, Union General Hancock.

Hancock survived the war and died in 1886. Armistead died at Gettysburg July 3, 1863. Captain Bingham attained the rank of General and later served 32 yeas in the United States House of Representatives. He was known as the "Father of the House".

Shown on the wall surrounding this monument are the names of the States whose soldiers fought at the Battle of Gettysburg.
 
Erected 1993 by The Right Worshipful Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of Pennsylvania.
 
Location. 39° 49.258′ N, 77° 13.906′ W. Marker is
Friend to Friend Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 21, 2009
3. Friend to Friend Memorial Marker
in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in Adams County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Steinwehr Avenue (State Highway 134) and Washington Street, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Located in the Gettysburg National Cemetery Annex. Marker is in this post office area: Gettysburg PA 17325, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. New York State Memorial (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); 73rd Ohio Infantry (about 300 feet away); Continuing a Tradition: Freemasonry at Gettysburg (about 300 feet away); 55th Ohio Infantry (about 400 feet away); Bvt. Maj. Gen. Charles H.T. Collis Memorial (about 400 feet away); 75th Pennslyvania Volunteers (about 400 feet away); Major General John Reynolds (about 400 feet away); Soldier’s National Monument (about 500 feet away); The Gettysburg Address (about 500 feet away); Battery G, Fourth U.S. Artillery (about 500 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Gettysburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. Winfield Scott Hancock. Winfield Scott Hancock (February 14, 1824 – February 9, 1886) was a career U.S. Army officer and the Democratic nominee for President of the United States in 1880. He served with distinction in the Army for four decades, including service in the Mexican-American War and as a Union general in the American Civil War.
Close Up of the Statue image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 21, 2009
4. Close Up of the Statue
(Submitted on November 26, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Lewis Armistead. Lewis Addison Armistead (February 18, 1817 – July 5, 1863) was a career United States Army officer who became a brigadier general in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. On July 3, 1863, as part of Pickett's Charge during the Battle of Gettysburg, Armistead led his brigade to the farthest point reached by Confederate forces during the charge, a point now referred to as the high-water mark of the Confederacy. However, he and his men were overwhelmed, and he was wounded and captured by Union troops; he died in a field hospital two days later. (Submitted on November 26, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. Henry H. Bingham. Henry Harrison Bingham (December 4, 1841 – March 22, 1912) was a Union Army officer in the American Civil War, who received the United States Military's highest award for valor, the Medal of Honor, for his actions at the Battle of the Wilderness. (Submitted on November 26, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. Pickett's Charge. Pickett's Charge was an infantry assault ordered by Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee against Maj. Gen. George G. Meade's Union positions on Cemetery Ridge on July 3, 1863, the last day of the Battle
Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 22, 2015
5. Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial
of Gettysburg in the state of Pennsylvania during the American Civil War. (Submitted on November 26, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Fraternal or Sororal OrganizationsWar, US Civil
 
Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial (Reverse) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 22, 2015
6. Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial (Reverse)
Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial Cornerstone image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 22, 2015
7. Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial Cornerstone
Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 22, 2015
8. Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial
Friend to Friend Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 21, 2009
9. Friend to Friend Memorial
Friend to Friend Memorial Marker, a little more color detail image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, July 12, 2003
10. Friend to Friend Memorial Marker, a little more color detail
Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 22, 2015
11. Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial
Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 22, 2015
12. Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial
Major General Winfield Scott Hancock (1824-1886) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott
13. Major General Winfield Scott Hancock (1824-1886)
He was noted in particular for his personal leadership at the Battle of Gettysburg in 1863. One military historian wrote, "No other Union general at Gettysburg dominated men by the sheer force of their presence more completely than Hancock." As another wrote, "his tactical skill had won him the quick admiration of adversaries who had come to know him as the 'Thunderbolt of the Army of the Potomac'."
Brig. General Lewis Addison Armistead (1817-1863) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott
14. Brig. General Lewis Addison Armistead (1817-1863)
Armistead's wounds were not believed to be mortal; he had been shot in the fleshy part of the arm and below the knee, and according to the surgeon who tended him, none of the wounds caused bone, artery, or nerve damage. He was then taken to a Union field hospital at the George Spangler Farm where he died two days later.
Capt. Henry H. Bingham (1841-1912) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 22, 2015
15. Capt. Henry H. Bingham (1841-1912)
He received the personal effects from the mortally wounded Confederate Brigadier General Lewis A. Armistead and carried the news to General Hancock, Armistead's friend from before the war.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,015 times since then and 99 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   9. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   10. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   11, 12, 13, 14, 15. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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