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Gettysburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Second Division

Eleventh Corps

 

—Army of the Potomac —

 
Second Division, Eleventh Corps Tablet image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, December 27, 2008
1. Second Division, Eleventh Corps Tablet
Above the tablet is the crescent moon symbol of Eleventh Corps.
Inscription.
Army of the Potomac
Eleventh Corps

Brig. General Adolph Von Steinwehr
First Brigade Col. Charles R. Coster
Second Brigade Col. Orlando Smith

July 1 Arrived about 2 p.m. and went into position on Cemetery Hill supporting Battery I New York First Artillery and covered the commanding position there skirmishers taking possession of a church and nearby house to prevent occupancy by Confederate sharpshooters. The First and Third Division having advanced in a line extending from Rock Creek to Mummasburg Road to connect with the right of First Corps became hotly engaged with Hoke's and Hays's Brigades Early's Division moved toward town in rear of the Union right and the First Brigade was sent through town to hold them.
The Brigade retreated through town and joined Second Brigade about 4.30 p.m.

July 2. Heavy Artillery firing from 4 to 6 p.m. between 8 and 9 p.m. the Division was attacked by Hays's Louisiana Brigade which penetrated to Battery I First New York Light Artillery and was repulsed with great loss.

July 3 Not engaged but subject to the fire of sharpshooters and Artillery.

Casualties. Killed 3 officers 104 men. Wounded 14 officers 493 men. Captured or missing 14 officers 318 men. Total 946.
 
Erected 1910 by Gettysburg National Military
Steinwehr's Division Tablet image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, December 27, 2008
2. Steinwehr's Division Tablet
Park Commission.
 
Location. 39° 49.304′ N, 77° 13.792′ W. Marker is in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in Adams County. Marker is on Baltimore Pike (State Highway 97), on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Located opposite the north entrance to the Gettysburg National Cemetery, on East Cemetery Hill in Gettysburg National Military Park. Marker is in this post office area: Gettysburg PA 17325, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Gettysburg Address (a few steps from this marker); Army of the Potomac (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Army of the Potomac (a few steps from this marker); Soldiers' National Cemetery (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Army of the Potomac (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Army of the Potomac (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Army of the Potomac (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Army of the Potomac (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Gettysburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. East Cemetery Hill. National Park Service virtual tour stop. (Submitted on March 9, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Report of Brig. Gen. Adolph von Steinwehr
General Adolph von Steinwehr image. Click for more information.
3. General Adolph von Steinwehr
Steinwehr was a former German military officer who immigrated to the U.S. after 1847. He volunteered his services in 1861 and helped raise the 29th New York, mostly composed of fellow German immigrants. Early service in the war brought him promotions to Brigade then Division command. He would lead the division at Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. Even though his peers and superiors spoke favorably of him, reorganizations of the army corps put Steinwehr out of a job. After the war he wrote extensively on mathematics, cartography, and geography.

(Image source: Wikipedia)
Click for more information.
. General Steinwehr described the importance of Cemetery Hill, and the precautions taken to secure the ground, in his official report:
Cemetery Hill is the commanding point of the whole position, and its occupation by our troops had a decisive influence upon the further progress and the final result of the battle. When I arrived upon it, the First Corps and the First and Third Divisions of our corps were engaged with the enemy on the open fields below. I placed the First Brigade, Col. Charles R. Coster, on the northeast end of the hill, in support of Wiedrich's battery, which was then in position. The Second Brigade, Col. Orland Smith, took a position toward the northwest, supporting the reserve artillery of our corps. Colonel Coster threw forward one regiment as skirmishers in front of his position, and another one into a large stone church and the surrounding houses in town, in order to prevent the enemy's sharpshooters from annoying our artillery. (Submitted on March 9, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 595 times since then and 77 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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