Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Proffit in Albemarle County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Proffit Historic District

 
 
Proffit Historic District Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, March 8, 2009
1. Proffit Historic District Marker
Inscription. Ben Brown and other newly freed slaves, who founded the community after the Civil War, first named the settlement Egypt and then Bethel. About 1881, the community became known as Proffit when the Virginia Midland Railway placed a stop here, stimulating further development between 1890 and 1916 by white landowners who bulit along Proffit Road. Prominent reminders of Proffitís black heritage are Evergreen Baptist Church, built in 1891, and several houses constructed by the Brown and Flannagan families in the 1880s. The district was listed on the Virginia Landmarks Register in 1998 and the National Register of Historic Places in 1999.
 
Erected 2000 by Department of Historic Resources. (Marker Number G-22.)
 
Location. 38° 6.342′ N, 78° 25.38′ W. Marker is in Proffit, Virginia, in Albemarle County. Marker is on Proffit Road (County Route 649) near Mossing Ford Lane (County Route 741), on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Charlottesville VA 22911, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Rio Mills (approx. 2 miles away); Monacan Indian Village (approx.
Marker at Evergreen Baptist Church image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, March 8, 2009
2. Marker at Evergreen Baptist Church
2 miles away); Skirmish at Rio Hill (approx. 3 miles away); Rio Hill 1864 Skirmish (approx. 3 miles away); Rio Hill (approx. 3 miles away); Southwest Mountains Rural Historic District (approx. 4.2 miles away); First Buck Mountain Church (approx. 4.6 miles away); Earlysville Union Church (approx. 4.8 miles away).
 
Also see . . .  17Ę Away from Charlottesville. Interviews with James E. Payne in Proffit Virginia by Mikea Brand, University of Virginia. “The railroad station was far from the house—the one Iím talking about now. The station was torn down, but house is still there. It was two rooms for passengers, a baggage room, and a operatorís room—Morse code. Five trains a day. I think, 3 going south and two going north. 17Ę fare to Charlottesville. Double track then, though. Ainít but one track down there now. Sidetrack and everything. We used to work on Saturday loading with pulpwood and stuff in it. People go into the mountains, bring pulpwood—you know, to make paper out of. Down there working all Saturday trying to make a couple of quarters.” (Submitted on March 11, 2009.) 
 
Categories. African AmericansNotable Places
 
Site of the 'Wash' Flannagan house image. Click for full size.
By Paul Crumlish, November 28, 2009
3. Site of the 'Wash' Flannagan house
The ruins of the Washington 'Wash' Flannagan, one of the earliest residents of Proffit.
Site of the Ben Brown house image. Click for full size.
By Paul Crumlish, November 28, 2009
4. Site of the Ben Brown house
The ruins of the home of Ben Brown, one of the earliest residents of Proffit.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,042 times since then and 121 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   3, 4. submitted on , by PaulwC3 of Northern, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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