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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fort Wayne in Allen County, Indiana — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Little Turtle

 
 
Little Turtle Marker Photo, Click for full size
By William Fischer, Jr., December 30, 2008
1. Little Turtle Marker
Inscription. Miami Chief Mishikinakwa or Me-she-kin-no-quah, known to the Euro-Americans as Little Turtle, born circa 1747, played a significant role in the settlement of the area surrounding the confluence of the Three Rivers. He was the most successful Native American resistance leader during the frontier wars of the late 1700s. He was also one of President George Washington's greatest concerns in the development of the young United States. It was important to the new nation to hold control of this area, then the western frontier, and keep it out of the hands of the British. Little Turtle is credited with having defeated the American armies led by General Josiah Harmar in 1790 and General Arthur St. Clair in 1791. He warned his people to make peace with General Anthony Wayne “who never sleeps.” However, they would not listen and were defeated by Wayne in 1794. Although he was a great war chief, his importance lay in his extraordinary skills as a leader of the Miami people. At the signing of the Treaty of Greenville with General Anthony Wayne in 1795, Little Turtle referred to the confluence, or Miamitown, as “that glorious gate” to the west. Little Turtle later visited George Washington who received him graciously, presenting him with gifts. In future years, Little Turtle visited with Presidents John Adams and Thomas Jefferson.
Little Turtle Sculpture by Hector Garcia Photo, Click for full size
By William Fischer, Jr., December 30, 2008
2. Little Turtle Sculpture by Hector Garcia
Saint Mary's River in background.
Little Turtle died in July of 1812 and was buried with full military honors in the Miami burial grounds along the St. Joseph River.
 
Erected by City of Fort Wayne and Superior Essex.
 
Location. 41° 5.135′ N, 85° 8.291′ W. Marker is in Fort Wayne, Indiana, in Allen County. Click for map. Marker is one of a series that ring the Great Meadow in Headwaters Park. This marker is about 100 feet NW of the footbridge over the Saint Mary's River leading to the reconstructed Old Fort. Statue is about 100 feet NE of the marker. Marker is at or near this postal address: 333 S. Clinton Street, Fort Wayne IN 46802, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Wabash & Erie Canal (within shouting distance of this marker); Miami Legend of the Sandhill Crane (within shouting distance of this marker); Earliest Railroad (within shouting distance of this marker); The Fur Traders and the Military at Fort Wayne (within shouting distance of this marker); Duck Creek: Early Industry and Business Development (within shouting distance of this marker); First Americans (within shouting
Little Turtle Sculpture Marker Photo, Click for full size
By William Fischer, Jr., December 30, 2008
3. Little Turtle Sculpture Marker
Little Turtle Me-she-kin-no-quah Chief of Miami Indian Nation In Commemoration of Our Nation's Bicentennial Hector Garcia, Sculptor 1976
distance of this marker); The Floods (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Early Effort To Build A Park (about 300 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Fort Wayne.
 
Also see . . .  Michikinikwa also known as Little Turtle - Ohio History Central. (Submitted on March 15, 2009, by William Fischer, Jr. of Fort Scott, Kansas.)
 
Categories. Colonial EraNative AmericansPatriots & PatriotismSettlements & SettlersWars, US Indian
 
Great Meadow in Headwaters Park Photo, Click for full size
By William Fischer, Jr., December 30, 2008
4. Great Meadow in Headwaters Park
Several markers along path circling the Great Meadow, looking south with downtown Fort Wayne in background.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Fort Scott, Kansas. This page has been viewed 3,984 times since then and 169 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Fort Scott, Kansas. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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