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Fort Meade in Anne Arundel County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Major General George G. Meade

Fort George G. Meade - United States Army

 
 
Major General George G. Meade Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, March 12, 2009
1. Major General George G. Meade Marker
A logo with image of U.S. M1917/Renault FT17 light tank appears at the top of the marker.
Inscription. George Gordon Meade was born on December 31, 1815, during his parentsí temporary residence in Cadiz, Spain. After arriving in the United States, he attended boarding schools in Philadelphia and Baltimore. He graduated from the U.S. Military Academy, West Point, NY, in 1835.

Upon graduation, Meade was commissioned a Second Lieutenant and saw service in the Seminole and Mexican Wars. He was honored for bravery at the Battles of Monerey, Palo Alto, and Resca de la Palma. Promoted to First Lieutenant in 1857, he supervised the construction of lighthouses along the Atlantic coast.

At the outbreak of the Civil War, Meade was appointed a Brigadier General of Volunteers and given command of a brigade. Severely wounded in the Peninsular Campaign, he recovered to fight at 2nd Bull Run, South Mountain and Antietam. He was promoted to Major General in November 1862 and commanded a Union corps at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville. In July 1863, he led the Army of the Potomac to a decisive victory over Leeís Army of Northern Virginia. For the remainder of the war, Meade and General Grant traveled together.

After the war, Major General Meade commanded several military departments, includingthe Department of the South. In the fall of 1872, while still on active duty, he contracted pneumonia. On November 6, 1872 the “Hero
Major General George G. Meade Marker, left foreground image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, March 12, 2009
2. Major General George G. Meade Marker, left foreground
the "Constitution Park" marker (and the grounds of the planned "Centennial Park") are visible, right background.
of Gettysburg” died.

In 1917 the village of Admiral, Maryland and surrounding land was acquired for a military cantonment and named Camp Meade. In 1928, Camp Meade was made a permanent installation and the campís name was changed to Fort Leonard Wood because there already existed a Camp Meade in South Dakota. Many Pennsylvania citizens, who considered General Meade a native son, protested the change in names. Therefore, a Pennsylvania Congressman attached a rider to the Defense Appropriation Bill of 1929, officially changing the postís name to Fort George Meade.
 
Erected 1997 by Fort George G. Meade Museum.
 
Location. 39° 6.061′ N, 76° 44.34′ W. Marker is in Fort Meade, Maryland, in Anne Arundel County. Marker is on English Avenue 0.2 miles south of Mapes Road, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is between Mapes Road and Upton Avenue, on the lawn north of the Constitution Park turn out, the future site of the planned "Centenniel Park". Marker is in this post office area: Fort George G Meade MD 20755, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 18th Century French Mortar (within shouting distance of this marker); White Oak (within shouting distance of this marker);
Major General George G. Meade image. Click for more information.
3. Major General George G. Meade
(Image Source: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, Brady-Handy Photograph Collection, Reproduction number: LC-DIG-cwpbh-01198)
Click for more information.
Maj. Gen. Ralph H. Van Deman (approx. 0.2 miles away); 29th Infantry Division, United States Army (approx. ľ mile away); Hodges Hall (approx. 0.3 miles away); The Battle of the Bulge (approx. 0.3 miles away); Dedicated to all American Ex-Prisoners of War (approx. 0.3 miles away); Post Hospital (approx. 0.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Fort Meade.
 
More about this marker. Drivers without military identification are presently required to obtain a visitor's pass and instructions at the main gate and before proceeding onto the post.
 
Also see . . .
1. Fort Meade Museum. (Submitted on March 14, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
2. George G. Meade. (Submitted on March 14, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Categories. MilitaryWar, US CivilWar, World I
 
Fort George G. Meade Constitution Park marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, March 12, 2009
4. Fort George G. Meade Constitution Park marker
"Dedicated September 17, 1987 in honor of the Bicentenniel of the United States Constitution - John H. Valieant, Installation Commander."
"Future Site of Centenniel Park" sign and "White Oak" marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, March 12, 2009
5. "Future Site of Centenniel Park" sign and "White Oak" marker
Fort Meade project announcement sign, recently placed above a plaque from 1986 commemorating the tree planted at this site in commemoration of the Annapolis Convention - the meeting of commissioners from five States in 1786 to "remedy defects of the federal government" which led to the Philadelphia Convention of 1789 and creation of the U.S. Constitution.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 1,720 times since then and 88 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   3. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   4, 5. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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