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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fort Meade in Anne Arundel County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

EA-3B Skywarrior

... to the memory of all the U.S. Naval aircrews that gave their lives ...

 
 
EA-3B Skywarrior Marker - Panel 1 Photo, Click for full size
By Richard E. Miller, January 3, 2009
1. EA-3B Skywarrior Marker - Panel 1
Inscription. [Panel 1:]
The EA-3B Skywarrior was in service for more than three decades in the U.S. Navy’s secret reconnaissance war against the Soviet Union and the Warsaw Pact. Conceived at the dawn of th Cold War as an aircraft carrier-based nuclear bomber, the A-3 Skywarrior was the largest aircraft ever designed to operate from an aircraft carrier - hence its nickname, “the Whale.” The aircraft was also an ideal platform for electronic reconnaissance, a mission it filled around the globe beginning in 1956. Designated the EA-3B in 1961, the aircraft and its crew of seven offered the fleet unique electronic reconnaissance capabilities that served the Navy well in numerous Cold War-era conflicts and crises, including the Vietnam War. The U.S. Navy retired its last EA-3B from service in October 1991.

[Panel 2:]
The EA-3B Bu No 144850, Ranger-12 assigned to Navy Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron (VQ-2), crashed during an operational mission in the Mediterranean on 25 January 1985 while landing on the USS Nimitz, killing all seven crew members:

LT Stephen H. Batchelder
LCDR Ronald L. Callender
AT2 Richard A. Hertzling
LT Allen A. Levine
CTI3 Patrick T. Price
LT James D. Richards
CTI3 Craig H. Rudolph

This EA-3B, dedicated at the National
EA-3B Skywarrior Marker - Panel 2 Photo, Click for full size
By Richard E. Miller, January 3, 2009
2. EA-3B Skywarrior Marker - Panel 2
Vigilance Park in July 2004, bears the markings of the lost aircraft, to commemorate their sacrifice.

[Seal of the] Department of the Navy, United States of America

[Panel 3:]
This display is dedicated to the memory of all the U.S. Naval aircrews that gave their lives in secret electronics surveillance missions around the world in defense of freedom.
[Rendering of an EA-3B Skywarrior]
This aircraft is on loan from the National Museum of Naval Aviation, Pensacola Florida.
 
Erected 2004 by Department of the Navy.
 
Location. 39° 6.709′ N, 76° 46.481′ W. Marker is in Fort Meade, Maryland, in Anne Arundel County. Marker can be reached from Colony Seven Road 0.1 miles west of Canine Road. Click for map. From the Patuxent Freeway (MD 32) or The Baltimore-Washington Parkway (MD 295), follow signage to the National Cryptographic Museum via Canine Road (toward the entrance to the National Security Agency), and turn left on to Colony Seven Road. Enter the parking area adjacent to National Vigilance Park, southeast of the Museum. Marker is in this post office area: Fort George G Meade MD 20755, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. National Vigilance Park (within shouting
EA-3B Skywarrior Marker - Panel 3 Photo, Click for full size
By Richard E. Miller, January 3, 2009
3. EA-3B Skywarrior Marker - Panel 3
distance of this marker); U.S.S. Liberty (approx. 0.2 miles away); Annapolis and Elk Ridge Railroad (approx. 1.4 miles away); "Cav. Area" (approx. 1.5 miles away); Chapultepec Avenue (approx. 1.5 miles away); Cavalry Area (approx. 1.5 miles away); World War I Cantonment Area (approx. 1.6 miles away but has been reported missing); Tipton Army Airfield (approx. 1.6 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Fort Meade.
 
Additional keywords. SIGINT, National Security Agency, NSA, cryptology, espionage
 
Categories. Air & SpaceMilitaryWar, ColdWaterways & Vessels
 
EA-3B Skywarrior Photo, Click for full size
By Richard E. Miller, January 3, 2009
4. EA-3B Skywarrior
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 2,797 times since then and 86 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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