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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Gettysburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

11th Corps Headquarters

 
 
11th Corps Headquarters Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 21, 2009
1. 11th Corps Headquarters Marker
The marker incorporates a 4.5-inch Siege Rifle and displays the crescent moon symbol of Eleventh Corps.
Inscription.
Army of the Potomac
11th. Corps Headquarters
Major General
Oliver O. Howard
July 1, 2, 3, 4, 1863

 
Erected 1913 by Gettysburg National Military Park Commission.
 
Location. 39° 49.3′ N, 77° 13.733′ W. Marker is in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in Adams County. Marker is on Baltimore Pike (State Highway 97), on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Located on East Cemetery Hill in Gettysburg National Military Park. Marker is in this post office area: Gettysburg PA 17325, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 7th West Virginia Infantry (a few steps from this marker); Attack on Cemetery Hill (a few steps from this marker); Ricketts' Battery (a few steps from this marker); First Brigade (a few steps from this marker); Major General Oliver Otis Howard (within shouting distance of this marker); 14th Indiana Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); Battery I, First Regiment New York Light Artillery (within shouting distance of this marker); 73rd Pennsylvania Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Gettysburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. East Cemetery Hill.
Close Up of Plaque at Base image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 21, 2009
2. Close Up of Plaque at Base
National Park Service virtual tour stop. (Submitted on March 15, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Report of Maj. Gen. Oliver O. Howard. In his report, General Howard mentioned the terrain and the choice of Cemetery Hill for his headquarters:
After an examination of the general features of the country, I came to the conclusion that the only tenable position for my limited force was the ridge to the southeast of Gettysburg, now so well known as Cemetery Ridge. The highest point at the cemetery commanded every eminence within easy range. The slopes toward the west and south were gradual, and could be completely swept by artillery. To the north, the ridge was broken by a ravine running transversely. I at once established my headquarters near the cemetery, and on the highest point north of the Baltimore pike. (Submitted on March 15, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Howard Headquarters Marker and Statue image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 5, 2010
3. Howard Headquarters Marker and Statue
An equestrian statue of Gen. Howard is seen here to the left of the headquarters cannon marker on Cemetery Hill.
General Oliver Otis Howard image. Click for full size.
4. General Oliver Otis Howard
General Howard was an alumni of Bowdoin College, Maine and a 1854 graduate of West Point. He lost his right arm at the battle of Fair Oaks, June 1, 1862. After recovery, he served at the battle of Antietam, commanding a brigade. Promoted to Corps command over the winter, Howard lead the XI Corps at Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. After transfer to the Western theater, he and his corps participated in the battle of Chattanooga and the Atlanta Campaign. During the March to the Sea and Carolinas Campaign, Howard commanded the Army of the Tennessee. Post-war, Howard served in the west, in particular dealing with the Nes Perce tribe. After retirement, Howard was the central figure in the founding of Howard University, Washington, D.C.

[Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Brady-Handy Collection, reproduction number LC-DIG-cwpbh
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,265 times since then and 111 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   4. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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