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Adams Morgan in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Ambassadors of Faith

Roads to Diversity

 

—Adams Morgan Heritage Trail —

 
Ambassadors of Faith Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, March 7, 2009
1. Ambassadors of Faith Marker
Inscription.
Three dramatic religious structures dominate this corner. They are among some 40 religious institutions lining 16th Street between the White House and the Maryland state line.

Many serve as unofficial “embassies” representing the interests of their faiths before the U.S. Government. The neo-Baroque National Baptist Church, to your right, is a memorial to Roger Williams, founder of Rhode Island and champion of religious liberty. Its congregation has long worked for social justice and community betterment. The Carlos Rosario Public Charter School (1970) and the Academy of Hope (1980), both schools for immigrant and low-income populations, have met here.

The Peace King Center of the Unification Church, to your left, home to the followers of the Reverend Sun Myung Moon since 1977, was originally the Washington Chapel, Church of Latter-Day Saints. Completed in 1933 with some 16,000 blocks of marble brought from Utah, it drew from the modern style of the Morman Tabernacle in Salt Lake City. The church moved to Kensington, Maryland in the 1970s.

All Souls Church dates from 1877, and its current neo-Georgian building dates from 1924. Among its many famous congregants were President William Howard Taft and Senator Adlai Stevenson. In March 1965 its pastor, Rev. James Reeb, demonstrated the church’s
Ambassadors of Faith Marker - photo on reverse image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, March 7, 2009
2. Ambassadors of Faith Marker - photo on reverse
"Ready to place the Moroni angel statue atop the Mormon Chapel, 1933." Brigham Young University.
commitment to social justice by joining a voting rights march in Selma, Alabama. There he was murdered by White opponents. Reeb’s death contributed to the national outcry against racism that helped pass President Lyndon Johnson’s Voting Rights Act just a few days later.
 
Erected 2005 by Cultural Tourism DC. (Marker Number 5 of 18.)
 
Location. 38° 55.546′ N, 77° 2.195′ W. Marker is in Adams Morgan, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is on 16th Street, NW just south of Harvard Street, NW, on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20009, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Social Justice (a few steps from this marker); Polish-U.S. Diplomatic Relations (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Embassy of the Republic of Poland (about 400 feet away); Fashionable 16th Street (about 600 feet away); The Latino Community (about 700 feet away); Embassy of the Republic of Lithuania (about 700 feet away); Lithuania's March to Freedom (about 700 feet away); Life on the Park (approx. 0.2 miles away).
 
More about this marker. [Caption, picture in upper right]:
Washington churches on the
Ambassadors of Faith Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, March 7, 2009
3. Ambassadors of Faith Marker
on the sidewalk in front of the Unification Church, as seen from Harvard Street with the Mexican embassy in view across 16th Street.
hill overlook the city, 1935.

[Caption, picture in center]:
As All Souls Church’s first Black senior minister, Rev. David Eaton (1932-1992) led the church in social activism and service.

[Caption, picture on right, center]:
Demonstrators march from All Souls Church to protest the martyrdom of Rev. James Reeb, left, 1965.

[Clipping of Washington Post article (March 11, 1965) re: the assault on Rev. James J. Reeb in Alabama.]

[Caption, picture on left, below center]:
Academy of Hope graduate Lisa McBride and son.

[Caption, picture group on lower left]:
All Soul’s Parishioners, President William Howard Taft, left, and Senator Adali Stevenson.
 
Also see . . .
1. All Souls Church - history. (Submitted on March 16, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
2. Adams Morgan Heritage Trail markers that have been entered in the Historical Marker database. (Submitted on March 20, 2009.)
 
Additional comments.
1. Stevenson
The Adlai Stevenson pictured was never a Senator--rather a Governor and not a resident of the District. His son, Adlai III, was a Senator.His grandfather, Adlai I, was a Congressman and Cleveland's VP.
    — Submitted
Convergence of Adams-Morgan, (left), Columbia Heights (right), Mount Pleasant (center, background) image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, March 7, 2009
4. Convergence of Adams-Morgan, (left), Columbia Heights (right), Mount Pleasant (center, background)
View of three D.C. neighborhoods, looking north on 16h St. from south of the marker. (Note the Scottish Rite Masonic Temple, building at far left.)
April 7, 2012, by Charles Nau of Washington, District of Columbia.

 
Additional keywords. Family Federation of World Peace and Unification; FFWPU; Mount Pleasant; Columbia Heights
 
Categories. African AmericansChurches, Etc.Civil Rights
 
All Souls Church, Unitarian image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, March 7, 2009
5. All Souls Church, Unitarian
Northeast of marker, at Harvard Street.
National Baptist Memorial Church image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, March 15, 2009
6. National Baptist Memorial Church
North of Columbia Road.
Unification Church (Washington Family Church National Cathedral, FFWPU) image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, March 15, 2009
7. Unification Church (Washington Family Church National Cathedral, FFWPU)
View from Harvard Steet, NW.
Washington churches on the hill overlook the city, 1935. image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2015
8. Washington churches on the hill overlook the city, 1935.
Close-up of photo on marker
Rev. David Eaton image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2015
9. Rev. David Eaton
As All Souls Church’s first Black senior minister, Rev. David Eaton (1932-1992) led the church in social activism and service.
Close-up of photo on marker
Demonstrators, 1965 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2015
10. Demonstrators, 1965
Demonstrators march from All Souls Church to protest the martyrdom of Rev. James Reeb, left, 1965.
Close-up of photo on marker
Three Men Held in Selma Attack<br>The Washington Post, Thursday March 11, 1965 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2015
11. Three Men Held in Selma Attack
The Washington Post, Thursday March 11, 1965
The Rev. James J. Reeb
… beaten in Alabama

"The Rev. James J. Reeb, 38, who is well-known in the teeming neighborhoods of Washington's Tenth Precinct, was fighting for his life in Birmingham hospital last night [March 10th 1965]."
Close-up of news article on marker
Academy of Hope graduate Lisa McBride and son. image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2015
12. Academy of Hope graduate Lisa McBride and son.
Close-up of photo on marker
President Taft and Adlai Stevenson image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2015
13. President Taft and Adlai Stevenson
All Soul’s Parishioners, President William Howard Taft, left, and Senator Adlai Stevenson.
All Souls Unitarian Church image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2015
14. All Souls Unitarian Church
First Unitarian Church<br>Washington, D.C. image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2015
15. First Unitarian Church
Washington, D.C.
Organized
November 11,1821
Sixth and D Streets
1822 - 1876

Reorganized as
All Souls Chruch
Washington, D.C.
June 4, 1877
Fourteenth and L Streets
1877 - 1920
Sixteenth and Harvard Streets
1924 -     

(Plaque inside All Souls Church)
The Sanctuary image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2015
16. The Sanctuary
All Souls Church
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 1,977 times since then and 184 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on November 21, 2016.
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