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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Mount Pleasant in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Fashionable 16th Street

Village in the City

 

—Mount Pleasant Heritage Trail —

 
Fashionable 16th Street Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, March 15, 2009
1. Fashionable 16th Street Marker
Inscription. Today's 16th Street from the White House to Silver Spring, Maryland is one of the city's key gateways. But through the 1890s it jogged left where Mt. Pleasant Street runs today and then dead-ended at the edge of today's Rock Creek Park.

After decades on the city's wish list, in 1903, 16th Street was straightened and extended to Spring Road, several blocks north of here. This improvement, coupled with the arrival of the electric streetcar, made airy Mount Pleasant an attractive location for residential building. Suddenly, it was easy to commute downtown and back.

Two decades earlier, Mary Foote Hamilton, socialite developer and wife of Senator John Henderson, had begun working to make 16th Street the city's most fashionable. The couple lived in Henderson Castle (now demolished) at 16th and Florida Avenue. She lured embassies from France, Spain, Mexico Cuba, Lithuania, Italy, and Poland to 16th Street. Henderson also had the street re-named Avenue of the Presidents, but that lasted only one year.

When the Kenesaw Apartment House across the park opened in 1906, it led a wave of luxury apartment building here. The Kenesaw housed members of Congress and other prominent Washingtonians. Washington Senators pitcher Walter Johnson and his family lived there in 1915 while their house at 1843 Irving Street was under
Fashionable 16th Street Marker - photo on reverse image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, March 15, 2009
2. Fashionable 16th Street Marker - photo on reverse
"Rush hour traffic idles, left on 16th St. as the Mount Pleasant streetcars turn from Columbia Rd. into Mt. Pleasant St., 1952." Washintoniana Divison, D.C. Public Library.
construction.

In 1913 the Kenesaw owners donated today's park land to the city. President Coolidge dedicated this sculpture of Francis Asbury, the first bishop in America in 1924.
 
Erected 2006 by Cultural Tourism DC. (Marker Number 1 of 17.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Francis Asbury, Traveling Methodist Preacher marker series.
 
Location. 38° 55.651′ N, 77° 2.195′ W. Marker is in Mount Pleasant, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is on 16th Street, NW, just north of Harvard Street, NW, on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20009, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Wilson Center (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Social Justice (about 600 feet away); Upheaval and Activism (about 600 feet away); Ambassadors of Faith (about 600 feet away); Polish-U.S. Diplomatic Relations (approx. 0.2 miles away); Embassy of the Republic of Poland (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Latino Community (approx. 0.2 miles away); Main Street (approx. ¼ mile away).
 
More about this marker. Picture captions:

[Pictures in upper right of marker]:

The
Fashionable 16th Street Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, March 15, 2009
3. Fashionable 16th Street Marker
- view to the northwest, toward Mt. Pleasant St. Asbury Statue and the elegant Kenesaw House, background.
luxurious Kenesaw Apartment House, left, designed by architect George M. Stone, below, contained a pharmacy, visible on left, and a café.

[Map in center of marker]:
The site plan for the Kenesaw shows old 16th St., now Mt. Pleasant St., and Kenesaw Ave., now Irving St.

[Two pictures in lower left of marker]:
From left, Carolyn Ann, Hazel, Robert, Edwin and Walter Jr., the family of famed Senators pitcher, Walter "Big Train" Johnson, below right, on their Irving St. porch.

[Picture in lower right of marker]:
Mount Pleasant residents Christina and Barbara Leckie, dressed up for Easter pose next to the statue in Asbury Park in 1954.

[Pictures of street sign in lower right of marker]:
This sample sign was designed for the renaming of 16th St. as Avenue of the Presidents in 1913.
 
Additional keywords. Adams-Morgan, Columbia Heights.
 
Categories. Arts, Letters, MusicChurches, Etc.Hispanic AmericansNotable BuildingsNotable PersonsNotable PlacesRailroads & StreetcarsRoads & VehiclesSettlements & Settlers
 
Kenesaw image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2015
4. Kenesaw
The luxurious Kenesaw Apartment House designed by architect George M. Stone contained a pharmacy, visible on left, and a café.
Close-up of photo on marker
The Renaissance Condominium image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2015
5. The Renaissance Condominium
Formerly the Kenesaw Apartments
Johnson Family image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2015
6. Johnson Family
From left, Carolyn Ann, Hazel, Robert, Edwin and Walter Jr., the family of famed Senators pitcher, Walter "Big Train" Johnson.
Close-up of photo on marker
The Big Train image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2015
7. The Big Train
Walter "Big Train" Johnson, below right, on his Irving St. porch.
Close-up of photo on marker
Easter Pose image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2015
8. Easter Pose
Mount Pleasant residents Christina and Barbara Leckie, dressed up for Easter pose next to the statue in Asbury Park in 1954.
Close-up of photo on marker
George W. Stone image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2015
9. George W. Stone
designer of the Kenewaw Apartments
Close-up of photo on marker
Site Plan image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2015
10. Site Plan
The site plan for the Kenesaw shows old 16th St., now Mt. Pleasant St., and Kenesaw Ave., now Irving St.
Close-up of photo on marker
You Are Here<br>Mount Pleasant Heritage Trail image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2015
11. You Are Here
Mount Pleasant Heritage Trail
Close-up of map on marker
View to the south from the Fashionable 16th Street Marker - across Harvard St. and Columbia Rd. image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, March 15, 2009
12. View to the south from the Fashionable 16th Street Marker - across Harvard St. and Columbia Rd.
All Soul's Church (in Columbia Heights), left; Unification Church (in Adams-Morgan), right.
Francis Asbury image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2015
13. Francis Asbury
1745 — 1816
Pioneer
Methodist Bishop
In America
Francis Asbury image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2015
14. Francis Asbury
This statue by Augustus Lukeman was dedicated on October 15, 1924.
The [P]rophet<br>of the [L]ong Road image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2015
15. The [P]rophet
of the [L]ong Road
Mt. Pleasant Heritage Trail - Fashionable 16th Street Marker (Reverse) image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, March 15, 2009
16. Mt. Pleasant Heritage Trail - Fashionable 16th Street Marker (Reverse)
Tucked in to a bend in Rock Creek Park on the breezy heights above central Washington was one of the city's earliest suburban developments. It began as a village of government clerks mainly from New England, and stretched from 17th Street east to Seventh Street. Later it attracted prominent citizens to its site along fashionable 16th Street, and eventually yielded the area east of 16th Street to Columbia Heights. But that's only on the map. Mount Pleasant's boundaries depend on who you are and where you came from.
The arrival of the streetcar transformed the village into an urban enclave. Working people and newcomers to Washington began to call Mount Pleasant home in the mid-1900s. Its varied citizenry earned it the nickname "little U.N." By the 1970s Mt. Pleasant and Adams Morgan were recognized as the heart of the Latino immigrant community.
Mount Pleasant activists have often been on the cutting edge of important civic issues, and artists and musicians have been part of its daily life. While the neigborhood has changed with the city, some things remain constant. Children consider the National Zoo and Rock Creek Park their personal playgrounds, and residents shop and greet each other on Mount Pleasant Street. Colonial revival mansions, early apartment buildings, and rowhouses remain remarkably intact. A stroll along the 17 signs of Village in the City: Mount Pleasant Heritage Trail will introduce you to it all. Welcome.
... [Map.]
Francis Asbury statue: image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, March 15, 2009
17. Francis Asbury statue:
"Francis Asbury (1745-1816) Pioneer Methodist Bishop in America."
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 1,515 times since then and 107 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   12. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   13, 14, 15. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   16, 17. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on September 10, 2016.
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